Greenpeace Blog

Baby fish are hooked on plastic junk food

Posted by alice.hunter — 3 June 2016 at 11:15am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Oona Lönnstedt
Perch larvae that has ingested microplastic particles

Today brought yet more evidence that putting plastic in the ocean is probably not the best idea humankind has ever had.

Fishing for plankton is ridiculous.

Posted by Willie — 1 June 2016 at 5:04pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: http://spongebob.wikia.com/wiki/Sheldon_J._Plankton/gallery
Plankton is justifiably outraged.

In the ocean, plankton is food.

There are two types of plankton – tiny plants (phytoplankton) and tiny animals (zooplankton).

Zooplankton includes some eggs and larvae of things like fish and crabs, as well as some minute animals that feed on phytoplankton. That makes them the first link in any food chain, and the basis for all of the ocean’s food webs.

Taking 400,000 people on a trip to the Indian Ocean

Posted by Tom Lowe — 1 June 2016 at 3:18pm - Comments
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose/ Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II by blacking out their lights with eco-paint

If John West’s owner Thai Union doesn’t start protecting the oceans and those who work on them, we’ll continue to shut down their supply chains, explains Tom Lowe, who has just returned from the Greenpeace ship the Esperanza’s tour of the Indian Ocean.

Three ways you can tell Sainsbury's to drop John West!

Posted by alice.hunter — 31 May 2016 at 5:11pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose/Greenpeace
John West tuna is caught using unsustainable fishing devices

We’ve sent thousands of emails, hundreds of tweets and inundated their Customer Service phone line with calls - but Sainsbury’s still won’t speak out against unsustainable fishing.

Behind The Lens

Posted by MeenaRajput — 31 May 2016 at 2:44pm - Comments

Photographer, Will Rose, joined Greenpeace activists on an expedition to the Indian Ocean to remove dozens of destructive Fish Aggregating Devices. These FADs kill endangered marine life including sharks and turtles, but despite this, leading tuna brands John West and Thai Union continue to use them. Since our campaign launched, Tesco and Waitrose have threatened to remove John West from their shelves unless they clean up their act. 

What my grandmother would say about President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima

Posted by Daisuke Miyachi — 26 May 2016 at 4:55pm - Comments

World leaders are meeting in Japan for the G7, but on a side trip, President Obama is doing something no sitting US president has done before: visit Hiroshima. The city was flattened during World War Two by the first nuclear weapon used in warfare. Now more than ever, we need leadership to make sure that history doesn’t repeat itself. We need to go nuclear-free. 

Greenpeace volunteers confront destructive fishing

Posted by Alix FOSTER VAN... — 23 May 2016 at 6:00pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
A Greenpeace activist blockading a factory which supplies 'dirty' tuna to John West

If you were doing your weekly shop at Sainsbury’s last Saturday, you may have noticed that John West tuna was no longer in stock. ‘Hurray!’ you may have thought, ‘Sainsbury’s has finally decided to drop this horrific brand.’ If you looked a little closer, however, you would have noticed that Greenpeace was actually behind the lack of John West tuna in the tinned fish aisle. ;-)<--break->

Are noisy oceans to blame for beached whales?

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 23 May 2016 at 12:36pm - Comments
Sperm whales beached on the Dutch Island of Texel, Jan 2016
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Sperm whales beached on the Dutch Island of Texel, Jan 2016.

Noise is the most invisible of all the man-made threats to the ocean, but to whales who ‘see’ by hearing, they simply cannot escape it.

How well do you know these endangered species?

Posted by MeenaRajput — 21 May 2016 at 2:10pm - Comments

In the last of our series, we take a look back at some of our absolute favourite facts about our amazing Greenpeace animals:

11. Polar bears aren’t really white.

It’s true. Polar bears actually have black skin (take a look at their noses) that’s covered in transparent, pigment-free hair. Each individual polar bear hair scatters and reflects visible light which makes polar bears appear white, even though they’re not - sneaky.

How well do you know the orangutan?

Posted by Anonymous — 21 May 2016 at 9:33am - Comments

I’m Richard, a forests campaigner here at Greenpeace. I joined the forests team back in 2013, and since then I’ve learnt so many interesting and surprising things about these amazing animals while trying to protect them. Here are my 10 favourite orangutan facts:

10. Orangutans are ticklish