Greenpeace Blog

Shell's Arctic Albatross

Posted by James Turner - 30 January 2014 at 5:04pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: US Coast Guard
Shell's arctic drill ship, the Kulluk, run aground off the coast of Alaska

A little over ten years ago, Shell decided to invest in a major new project - drilling in the melting Arctic ocean off the Alaskan coast. At the time, oil prices were rocketing upwards and the world's demand for oil seemed to be rising inexorably. Shell believed it could bring modern technology to bear on one of the most hostile environments on the planet, and walk away with some of the estimated 90bn barrels of oil that experts believe exist in the Arctic.

The week two pulp and paper companies showed their true colours

Posted by Phil Aikman - 30 January 2014 at 11:58am - Comments

This week Asia Pulp and Paper, the target of a successful Greenpeace campaign, took yet another step along the road to reform. But its competitor APRIL is still clinging to rainforest destruction.

You can’t sink a rainbow, you can’t seize a sunrise

Posted by Alex Harris - 22 January 2014 at 3:44pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © John Cobb / Greenpeace
Alex Harris at the Greenpeace office in London

I trembled as I walked through the grounds of Murmansk prison on the 26th September.

Inmates watched me and the arrival of the other notorious 29 new prisoners through their cell windows. It was pitch black outside, but the prison was alive. Alive with the sound of barking dogs, prison alarms and prisoners shouting through their barred windows.

Resistance to deforestation and mining: a story of modern India

Posted by Paul Morozzo - 22 January 2014 at 1:28pm - Comments
Climbers dressed as tigers unfurl a banner on Essar's India HQ
All rights reserved. Credit: Sudhanshu Malhotra
An Indian energy company is planning to destroy valuable forests to mine coal

The story behind protests that happened today in both London and Mumbai is the story of modern India, and how it turns out will ultimately have implications for us all.

Essar - a giant Indian energy corporation - is building a coal power plant in central Indian state of Madya Pradesh. The plant needs millions of tons of coal to operate, and that coal lies beneath the nearby forests of Mahan, a rich habitat that supports the lives and livelihoods of over 14,000 people from 14 villages.

We're about to see how serious Europe is about climate change

Posted by sgelmini - 22 January 2014 at 11:58am - Comments
Wind park Gunfleet Sands in the North Sea
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Langrock / Greenpeace
The UK government has been lobbying against a binding European target for renewable energy

If you’re concerned about the impact runaway climate change is likely to have on our planet, then you might want to keep an eye on what’s happening in Brussels today. At around midday, the European Commission will unveil a major package of measures on climate and energy. They are likely to cover a range of vital issues from cutting polluting carbon emissions to promoting clean energy, from regulating fracking to banning the most polluting transport fuels.

In pictures: the toxic truth of your children's clothes

Posted by Angela Glienicke - 20 January 2014 at 11:00am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Jeff Lau/Greenpeace
A worker screens a pattern onto children's wear in Huzhou, China

When I look at these shockingly colourful pictures of clothes manufacturing in China, it is a stark reminder that you don’t always know the full story behind the production of your kid's garments.

Business leaders give forest destroyer April one year to reform

Posted by Richardg - 17 January 2014 at 3:32pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: John Novis
Forest destruction by APRIL in Sumatra, Indonesia

Pressure is mounting on April, the notorious forest destroyer that is determinedly trying to pulp what’s left of Indonesia's rainforests. This afternoon, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development gave April an ultimatum: put down the chainsaws or get out of the clubhouse.

Repeat offender – the Russian factory trawler seized by Senegal

Posted by Willie - 14 January 2014 at 4:08pm - Comments
Greenpace takes action aginst Russian trawler fishing illegally in West Africa
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Greenpeace encounters the Oleg Naydenov fishing illegally in 2012

Have you heard the one about Greenpeace controlling the French Navy? No, me neither. But you might be forgiven for being confused by some recent reports about the Russian trawler seized in West Africa.

Pirate fishing is a big problem. Sometimes it’s fishing over quota (catching more than you should, or species that you shouldn’t), sometimes it’s fishing in ways or places you shouldn’t. Overfishing may seem like a victimless crime – but it isn’t, and the ultimate effect is bad news for our oceans, the creatures that live in them, and the humans whose livelihoods or future food source depends on them.

Toxic chemicals are the little monsters in children's clothing

Posted by Nadia Haiama - 14 January 2014 at 12:07pm - Comments
Burberry bag
All rights reserved. Credit: Emma Stoner / Greenpeace
Clothes from brands like Burberry have been found to contain hazardous chemicals

Today we told the world a story, a story about the little monsters in children's clothes and shoes. As the mother of a young daughter, this is one story I had to read and one that revealed a shocking truth about the clothes we buy for our kids.

Our latest investigation has revealed the presence of hazardous chemicals in clothing made by 12 very well known brands; from the iconic kid's label Disney, to sportswear brands like Adidas, and even top-end luxury labels like Burberry.

Don’t let them drill in the South Downs!

Posted by Anna Jones - 13 January 2014 at 1:47pm - Comments
by. Credit: Wiki commons

Our beautiful South Downs National Park is the target of frackers. This guide will show you how to lodge an objection to the application from Celtique Energie, but if you already know how to do it, email the South Downs National Park Authority now.

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