Greenpeace Blog

London election: What do the candidates have to say about solar power?

Posted by Diana Vogtel — 15 April 2016 at 12:47pm - Comments
Caroline Pidgeon, Sadiq Khan, Sian Berry, Zac Goldsmith
by-sa. Credit: Wikipedia
From left to right: Caroline Pidgeon, Sadiq Khan, Sian Berry, Zac Goldsmith

It has been two months since Greenpeace called on all mayoral candidates to set out clear plans to solarise London and commit to delivering a tenfold increase in solar power over the next 10 years. This target would see solar rolling out across an equivalent of nearly 200,000 rooftops across the capital by 2025.

And our survey says...Ban the bead!

Posted by Alice H — 14 April 2016 at 4:53pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Wikipedia
Toothpaste with microbeads

Many people may not yet be aware of what microbeads are. But one thing is for sure, when they learn that they're found in everyday products like face scrubs and toothpastes, and that they end up in our oceans and threaten marine wildlife, there is one popular reaction…

Ban them.

How you CAN help us uncover dirty tuna!

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 13 April 2016 at 4:45pm - Comments

Last year, Greenpeace confronted John West over a broken promise. Back in 2011, they promised customers that 100% of their tuna would be caught sustainably by the end of this year. But as of today, they’ve only reached 2% of that target. This means a whopping 98% of their tuna is caught in a way which often kills animals like endangered turtles, sharks and baby tuna.

In Pictures: Damning the Amazon

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 13 April 2016 at 3:54pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace
Forest next to the Tapajós river, in Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land

A report published this week by Greenpeace Brazil shines a spotlight on technology giant Siemens’ involvement in a massive hydropower dam planned for the Tapajós River.

Refugee Crisis: Not The New Normal

Posted by India Thorogood — 4 April 2016 at 4:00pm - Comments

The refugee crisis is still making the news, but as the tweets, comment pieces and protests die down, it’s easy to wonder if we’re becoming desensitised and numb to what we see. Are the sad faces squashed against boat and car windows, the babies in tatty lifejackets and sinking boats, becoming normal?

It's time for David Cameron to stop hiding in the smog!

Posted by Aakash Naik — 1 April 2016 at 4:04pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Elizabeth Dalziel/ Greenpeace

We all need to get from A to B, to go to work, to take our children to school. But we shouldn't have to breathe toxic air in order to do so. The Government must develop an action plan to clean up our air, improve our journeys and save thousands of lives every year.


We desperately need a clean air action plan to save thousands of lives every year.
Here are five policy areas the government should focus on immediately.   

Brazilian supermarket giant Pão de Açúcar stops buying deforestation beef

Posted by Richardg — 1 April 2016 at 12:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ze Gabriel
Activists in Sao Paulo put stickers on beef saying 'do you know where your beef comes from?'

Great news: Pão de Açúcar – one of Brazil’s major supermarket chains – has finally agreed to stop stocking beef linked to forest destruction. It's a huge victory for Brazilian consumers, who joined Greenpeace's campaign in their thousands - but it's also big deal for the planet. Here's why.

Floaty McFloatface: The New Name For Greenpeace's Rainbow Warrior Ship

Posted by Anonymous — 1 April 2016 at 9:25am - Comments
by-nc. Credit: Greenpeace
Floaty McFloatface

We're pleased to announce that, as of today, Greenpeace has renamed its iconic ship - the Rainbow Warrior - to Floaty McFloatface.

The step has been taken as part of a Greenpeace drive to rebrand for the 21st Century, helping to make the organisation relevant to the Millennial generation.

Plugging the energy gap - George Osborne’s trilema

Posted by Graham Thompson — 31 March 2016 at 7:00pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Getty

For a long time, many environmentalists were concerned that government efforts to clean up the world’s energy supply were a bit one-sided, in that we were getting on quite well with half the problem – generating clean energy. Meanwhile the other more important half – not generating dirty energy – was being largely ignored.

But here in the UK things have suddenly inverted in a dramatic fashion. Because by the end of this year, we will have 10 fewer gigawatts of coal power than we had at the start of 2015.

Indonesia: Is the world still looking away?

Posted by India Thorogood — 30 March 2016 at 11:40am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

‘Indonesia is burning - so why is the world looking away?’ Late last year those words shone a small spotlight on a massive climate crisis - now it looks like they could be depressingly relevant again.

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