Blog: Oceans

In pictures: Celebrating Tremendous Turtles for #WorldTurtleDay

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 22 May 2015 at 4:17pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace

We love turtles and Saturday's World Turtle Day is a great excuse to fish out all our amazing photos of these fabulous creatures that have been around for about 200 million years.

In pictures: Variety is the spice of life, celebrating World Biodiversity Day

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 15 May 2015 at 11:33am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace / John Novis
A blue-crowned motmot (Momotus momota) seen in the Amazon rainforest

The United Nations has declared May 22nd The International Day for Biodiversity. This year's theme focuses on sustainable development goals. We all enjoy living in a colourful world where different species play their various roles in the maintenance of an ecosystem that is so vital for our existence.<--break-><--break->

A Manifesto for Change

Posted by John Sauven — 1 May 2015 at 4:37pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Next year, the International Union of Geological Sciences will report on the outcome of one of the biggest scientific debates of our time: whether the Earth has entered a new geological epoch. For the last 10,000 years – a period that has seen the birth and flourishing of human civilisation – we have been living through the Holocene epoch. But there is an emerging consensus that this epoch may now be over, superseded by a new age: the Anthropocene. The age of humans.

How we made fish the ‘must-have’ prop of the election campaign

Posted by Emily Buchanan — 30 April 2015 at 12:26pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Jules, the Skipper of Rising Tide

There’s something fishy going on.

Greenpeace wins permission to take UK government to court over fish quotas

Posted by Ariana Densham — 24 April 2015 at 4:25pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: John Cobb / Greenpeace
Fishermen outside the High Court in 2013

Yesterday the UK High Court gave the green light for a full judicial review into whether the UK fishing quota allocation system is unlawful under new European law. 

The government has given out fishing quota in largely the same way since the mid-90s. About 95% of the fishing quota is awarded to the larger end of the fleet, most notably domestic and foreign controlled industrial fishing businesses – such as the vessel Cornelis Vrolijk - which we previously exposed. It's symbolic of just how broken the system is.

The next UK government promises to be an ocean champion

Posted by Willie — 20 April 2015 at 11:23am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Enric Sala/ Nat Geo

Here’s a prediction: the next UK government will do great things for global marine protection.

At this stage in a general election campaign it’s sometimes hard to find something that politicians wearing differently coloured rosettes can agree on, but with an unprecedented bunch of manifesto commitments, there’s a growing certainty that the next UK government will be an ocean champion.

Why does Greenpeace care about the Modern Slavery Act?

Posted by Daniel Jones — 31 March 2015 at 11:26am - Comments
Graphic saying 29.8 million people are in slavery in the world today
by-nc-nd. Credit: junaidrao
Global Slavery Index figures estimate almost 30 million people are still in slavery today

The Thai coastline has become a haven for young western tourists drawn by the pulls of warm weather, beautiful beaches and exciting new experiences. But only a matter of miles out to sea this idyllic image is offset by a different and altogether more harrowing setting, but one that the Modern Slavery Act will hopefully help make a thing of the past.

In pictures: Every drop matters, it's World Water Day!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 19 March 2015 at 6:12pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Markus Mauthe / Greenpeace
Waterfall in Papua New Guinea

When you put the kettle on for your morning coffee, spare a minute to think about World Water Day. Water is essential to life, yet nearly 750 million people are without access to clean drinking water or improved sanitation.<--break->

Illegal fishing coming to waters near you

Posted by Ariana Densham — 17 March 2015 at 2:32pm - Comments
Illegal fishing for Patagonian toothfish in Antarctic waters
All rights reserved. Credit: New Zealand Defence Force
Crew members aboard the Kunlun fishing illegally in the Southern Ocean haul in a Patagonian toothfish

Illegal fishing is a global problem. Between  €9 - €23 billion is lost every year to illegal fishing and often as a result of international organised crime. Previously, imports of illegal fishing products into the EU were estimated at €1.1 billion. It is often linked to environmental crimes which damage marine habitats and animals, not to mention food insecurity in developing countries, human, drugs and arms trafficking, as well as forced labour on board fishing vessels.

Illegal fishing can happen anywhere and at anytime and last week there were two very interesting developments both at home and abroad. 

Krill-gotten gains to fund Antarctic research

Posted by Willie — 25 February 2015 at 12:42am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Adelie penguins eat so much krill it can turn their poo pink. They'd probably like us not to eat any.

Scientific research and conservation need more cash. That’s sadly usually true. It’s especially the case in the Antarctic where research is expensive but absolutely essential given the massive environmental changes happening there.

But although new streams of funding should welcomed for Antarctic research, it’s also important to question where that funding comes from. After all, there’s just a sliver of a chance that some seemingly good PR is actually a mind-bogglingly cynical act of greenwashing.

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