Latest Energydesk posts http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/feeds/newsdesk en Energydesk weekend roundup http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-weekend-roundup <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Top stories1) UK becomes first EU country to pay utilities to keep plants open from consumer bills in bid to keep coal/nuclear/gas plants openThe UK is set to become the first country in the EU to pay utilities billions of pounds each year to ensure plants are kept open - however much power they sell into the market.The&nbsp;FT reports&nbsp;that the capacity market auction, which could cost bill-payers £1.8bn a year will start on Tuesday and is designed to head off the threat of blackouts after 2018&nbsp;as utilities retire plants which are uneconomic.The Guardian&nbsp;reports that much of the money (£3.3bn over three years)&nbsp;may go to French state-owned coal and nuclear operator EDF which has seen 8 nuclear and 2 coal plants pre-qualify under the scheme.The market had been envisaged as a way&nbsp;to support less-polluting gas plants which struggled to compete against cheaper coal and has been criticised for supporting coal and nuclear providers which are not struggling to remain economic.&nbsp;In October Centrica chief executive&nbsp;described the scheme as a paradox.“The cost of this will be levied on customers’ bills, alongside the cost of the carbon price floor, which is designed to encourage switching away from coal,” he said at the time. “There’s an inherent paradox here.” He added that it was “clear that old, dirty coal stations will be paid extra to stay online for longer.”&nbsp;(all The Times)Speaking to&nbsp;The Guardian Volker Beckers, the former chief executive of&nbsp;RWE npower&nbsp;and an ongoing adviser to HMRC, told The Guardian the subsidy would fail in it's main aim&nbsp;“I think the capacity market is not necessary if the ministers’ main objective is to attract new investment. I don’t think it will,” he added.2) UN agrees deal in Lima talks - may (or may not) lead to much bigger deal next yearUnited Nations members have reached an agreement&nbsp;on how countries should tackle climate change.&nbsp;Delegates have approved a framework for setting national pledges to be submitted to a summit next year.The deal, described by the EU as a step towards a bigger deal in Paris next year and by some environmental groups as ineffectual, came after talks over-ran by two days due to disagreements over key issues including the role to be played by developing nations and the detail attached to country pledges on emissions reductions.Carbon Brief&nbsp;has an excellent briefing on the deal here,&nbsp;Reuters has a factbox. Writing in&nbsp;The Guardian Lord Stern&nbsp;explains the dispute over common and differentiated responsibilities whilst&nbsp;E3G's Nick Maybe&nbsp;has an insightful analysis about another key issue of the talks - the transparency of country pledges on climate."The final result in Lima got just enough to give direction and basic guidance to countries for Paris," he argues, but adds:&nbsp;"In Paris there must be complete transparency on what every country’s promises really mean in terms of lowering climate risk and reshaping their economy. Lima hasn’t guaranteed this. This really matters."For another take India's Financial Express reports: "Lima climate deal results in precious little; India satisfied". We don't think they meant to link those two statements.&nbsp;3) Oil price rallies as Opec reinforces position (these two don't actually make sense together but it's how it's reported)Brent crude bounced back&nbsp;from a fresh five and a half year low after Opec ministers reinforced the message that the cartel would not cut production in defence of higher prices.&nbsp;"We are not going to change our minds because the prices went to $60 or to $40,” said current OPEC president&nbsp;Suhail Al-Mazrouei, the energy minister for the UAE.The Economist&nbsp;has an excellent map on the winners and losers from the still quite low oil price (below), whilst the Guardian reports that a number&nbsp;of UK energy firms have gone bust.&nbsp;In other news&nbsp;A couple&nbsp;of UK energy stories:-&nbsp;Chinese nuclear operator buys up EDF's UK wind farms-&nbsp;UK energy secretary calls for small providers to grab 30% of the marketAnd from around the world:-&nbsp;Vestas in huge Africa wind order- The Economist on what is wrong with Germany energy policy- Coal prices continue to fall&nbsp;Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-weekend-roundup#comments News energy Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:20:15 +0000 damiankahya 368579 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Energydesk Daily Dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-57 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From EnergydeskAway from the climate summit, documents reveal Polish coal bid for EU infrastructure moneyAn analysis by Bankwatch and Energydesk&nbsp;of a&nbsp;six hundred page document prepared by an EU task-force listing projects which could benefit from the planned 300bn euro infrastructure push includes around 8bn euros of coal project in Poland including a giant new Lignite mine. The document also reveals Polish concerns over its mining project claiming environmental opposition would need to be "managed".The&nbsp;European Union has prepared&nbsp;a list of almost 2,000 candidate projects, with a total value of 1300 billion euros, which could benefit from the €315 billion investment plan.&nbsp;EurActiv&nbsp;reports, noting a French bid for significant funds to back an efficiency drive.&nbsp;Top stories1) Climate summit briefing: No US-India deal likely&nbsp;Over in Lima word has emerged&nbsp;that the&nbsp;US&nbsp;is not involved in any "China style"&nbsp;agreement on climate with India ahead of President Obama's Republic Day visit to New Delhi.Indeed,&nbsp;Bloomberg reports,&nbsp;that India is not ready to join the US and China in agreeing to cap emissions preferring to focus on its investments in renewable energy and especially Solar which India's&nbsp;Economic Times&nbsp;believes could be "India's shale".Aside from India the&nbsp;FT reports that business is calling for a greater say in global climate negotiations ahead of the next major - and possibly defining - summit in Paris. The&nbsp;New Scientist&nbsp;has a primer on what to expect from these negotiations and&nbsp;Carbon Brief has an infographic&nbsp;of the alliances at the summit.&nbsp;2) Oil market: Exxon claims renewables 'not ready' as US gas-guzzlers returnThe Guardian reports that “Peak oil theorists&nbsp;have been run out of town by American ingenuity," says Bill Colton, Exxon's chief strategist outlining the firm's view of the coming energy market.Colton says he expects the US to be a major exporter of fossil fuels by 2025 with gas taking over from coal amidst efforts to reduce emissions. As for renewables? They'll account for around 4% of the world's power by 2040 as global temperatures rise far beyond 2 degrees.And there are signs that the falling oil price may lead to a pick up in demand for fossil fuels, at least in the form of rising sales of US SUV's and other high fuel consumption vehicles.&nbsp;“That is a trend we’ve seen in the US, those purchases follow fuel prices. [Sales of]hybrids go up when gas prices go up. It’s surprising people make those decisions, because you’ll have a car for 15 years, generally,” Ellen Anderson,&nbsp;director of University of Minnesota’s&nbsp;Energy&nbsp;Transition Lab told The Guardian.The BBC reports on other winners&nbsp;from the falling oil price, including drivers in Europe and - of course - the beleagured airline industry, whilst in&nbsp;The Times former BP CEO John Browne&nbsp;argues that - ultimately - the only thing which will limit fossil fuel consumption will be a carbon price."Throughout my career," he says, "I have never predicted the price of oil. The complex interaction of supply, demand, Opec, crises and the environment means that it would be foolish to do so. However, I am willing to predict that carbon pricing will happen one day."And that, presumably, is the basis for&nbsp;UK energy secretary Ed Davey's&nbsp;latest intervention suggesting that investors should disclose their holdings in firms such as Mr Colton's Exxon in case the world doesn't pan out exactly the way he envisages and oil firms face structural threats. For now though - the car &amp; holiday market is there to lend a helping hand.In other news:- Petronas signs Argentina shale deal-&nbsp;UK eyes three advanced biofuels plants-&nbsp;In China a power plant is burning banknotes (no really, this is a thing).Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-57#comments News energy Thu, 11 Dec 2014 09:09:17 +0000 damiankahya 368460 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Energydesk Daily Dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-56 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From EnergydeskAway from the climate summit, documents reveal Polish coal bid for EU infrastructure moneyAn analysis by Bankwatch and Energydesk&nbsp;of a&nbsp;six hundred page document prepared by an EU task-force listing projects which could benefit from the planned 300bn euro infrastructure push includes around 8bn euros of coal project in Poland including a giant new Lignite mine. The document also reveals Polish concerns over its mining project claiming environmental opposition would need to be "managed".The&nbsp;European Union has prepared&nbsp;a list of almost 2,000 candidate projects, with a total value of 1300 billion euros, which could benefit from the €315 billion investment plan.&nbsp;EurActiv&nbsp;reports, noting a French bid for significant funds to back an efficiency drive.&nbsp;Top stories1) Climate summit briefing: No US-India deal likely&nbsp;Over in Lima word has emerged&nbsp;that the&nbsp;US&nbsp;is not involved in any "China style"&nbsp;agreement on climate with India ahead of President Obama's Republic Day visit to New Delhi.Indeed,&nbsp;Bloomberg reports,&nbsp;that India is not ready to join the US and China in agreeing to cap emissions preferring to focus on its investments in renewable energy and especially Solar which India's&nbsp;Economic Times&nbsp;believes could be "India's shale".Aside from India the&nbsp;FT reports that business is calling for a greater say in global climate negotiations ahead of the next major - and possibly defining - summit in Paris. The&nbsp;New Scientist&nbsp;has a primer on what to expect from these negotiations and&nbsp;Carbon Brief has an infographic&nbsp;of the alliances at the summit.&nbsp;2) Oil market: Exxon claims renewables 'not ready' as US gas-guzzlers returnThe Guardian reports that “Peak oil theorists&nbsp;have been run out of town by American ingenuity," says Bill Colton, Exxon's chief strategist outlining the firm's view of the coming energy market.Colton says he expects the US to be a major exporter of fossil fuels by 2025 with gas taking over from coal amidst efforts to reduce emissions. As for renewables? They'll account for around 4% of the world's power by 2040 as global temperatures rise far beyond 2 degrees.And there are signs that the falling oil price may lead to a pick up in demand for fossil fuels, at least in the form of rising sales of US SUV's and other high fuel consumption vehicles.&nbsp;“That is a trend we’ve seen in the US, those purchases follow fuel prices. [Sales of]hybrids go up when gas prices go up. It’s surprising people make those decisions, because you’ll have a car for 15 years, generally,” Ellen Anderson,&nbsp;director of University of Minnesota’s&nbsp;Energy&nbsp;Transition Lab told The Guardian.The BBC reports on other winners&nbsp;from the falling oil price, including drivers in Europe and - of course - the beleagured airline industry, whilst in&nbsp;The Times former BP CEO John Browne&nbsp;argues that - ultimately - the only thing which will limit fossil fuel consumption will be a carbon price."Throughout my career," he says, "I have never predicted the price of oil. The complex interaction of supply, demand, Opec, crises and the environment means that it would be foolish to do so. However, I am willing to predict that carbon pricing will happen one day."And that, presumably, is the basis for&nbsp;UK energy secretary Ed Davey's&nbsp;latest intervention suggesting that investors should disclose their holdings in firms such as Mr Colton's Exxon in case the world doesn't pan out exactly the way he envisages and oil firms face structural threats. For now though - the car &amp; holiday market is there to lend a helping hand.In other news:- Petronas signs Argentina shale deal-&nbsp;UK eyes three advanced biofuels plants-&nbsp;In China a power plant is burning banknotes (no really, this is a thing).Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-56#comments News energy Thu, 11 Dec 2014 09:09:04 +0000 damiankahya 368459 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Energydesk Daily Dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-55 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From EnergydeskAway from the climate summit, documents reveal Polish coal bid for EU infrastructure moneyAn analysis by Bankwatch and Energydesk&nbsp;of a&nbsp;six hundred page document prepared by an EU task-force listing projects which could benefit from the planned 300bn euro infrastructure push includes around 8bn euros of coal project in Poland including a giant new Lignite mine. The document also reveals Polish concerns over its mining project claiming environmental opposition would need to be "managed".The&nbsp;European Union has prepared&nbsp;a list of almost 2,000 candidate projects, with a total value of 1300 billion euros, which could benefit from the €315 billion investment plan.&nbsp;EurActiv&nbsp;reports, noting a French bid for significant funds to back an efficiency drive.&nbsp;Top stories1) Climate summit briefing: No US-India deal likely&nbsp;Over in Lima word has emerged&nbsp;that the&nbsp;US&nbsp;is not involved in any "China style"&nbsp;agreement on climate with India ahead of President Obama's Republic Day visit to New Delhi.Indeed,&nbsp;Bloomberg reports,&nbsp;that India is not ready to join the US and China in agreeing to cap emissions preferring to focus on its investments in renewable energy and especially Solar which India's&nbsp;Economic Times&nbsp;believes could be "India's shale".Aside from India the&nbsp;FT reports that business is calling for a greater say in global climate negotiations ahead of the next major - and possibly defining - summit in Paris. The&nbsp;New Scientist&nbsp;has a primer on what to expect from these negotiations and&nbsp;Carbon Brief has an infographic&nbsp;of the alliances at the summit.&nbsp;2) Oil market: Exxon claims renewables 'not ready' as US gas-guzzlers returnThe Guardian reports that “Peak oil theorists&nbsp;have been run out of town by American ingenuity," says Bill Colton, Exxon's chief strategist outlining the firm's view of the coming energy market.Colton says he expects the US to be a major exporter of fossil fuels by 2025 with gas taking over from coal amidst efforts to reduce emissions. As for renewables? They'll account for around 4% of the world's power by 2040 as global temperatures rise far beyond 2 degrees.And there are signs that the falling oil price may lead to a pick up in demand for fossil fuels, at least in the form of rising sales of US SUV's and other high fuel consumption vehicles.&nbsp;“That is a trend we’ve seen in the US, those purchases follow fuel prices. [Sales of]hybrids go up when gas prices go up. It’s surprising people make those decisions, because you’ll have a car for 15 years, generally,” Ellen Anderson,&nbsp;director of University of Minnesota’s&nbsp;Energy&nbsp;Transition Lab told The Guardian.The BBC reports on other winners&nbsp;from the falling oil price, including drivers in Europe and - of course - the beleagured airline industry, whilst in&nbsp;The Times former BP CEO John Browne&nbsp;argues that - ultimately - the only thing which will limit fossil fuel consumption will be a carbon price."Throughout my career," he says, "I have never predicted the price of oil. The complex interaction of supply, demand, Opec, crises and the environment means that it would be foolish to do so. However, I am willing to predict that carbon pricing will happen one day."And that, presumably, is the basis for&nbsp;UK energy secretary Ed Davey's&nbsp;latest intervention suggesting that investors should disclose their holdings in firms such as Mr Colton's Exxon in case the world doesn't pan out exactly the way he envisages and oil firms face structural threats. For now though - the car &amp; holiday market is there to lend a helping hand.In other news:- Petronas signs Argentina shale deal-&nbsp;UK eyes three advanced biofuels plants-&nbsp;In China a power plant is burning banknotes (no really, this is a thing).Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-55#comments News energy Thu, 11 Dec 2014 09:07:57 +0000 damiankahya 368458 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Damian's daily dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-daily-dispatch-65 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From EnergydeskCOP Notes: What's going on with "carbon neutrality" and will the UK sign up?As the summit progresses a groundswell of support&nbsp;has developed in favour of including in the final text a statement of bold ambition, grounded in the science of climate change, to ensure the world is carbon neutral by 2050. The UK seems unsure whether to push this - but is it already the government's position?In other news from Lima, in a major policy&nbsp;U-turn Australia has decided to give money to the global clean climate fund.&nbsp;Top stories1) Climate advisors: Clean energy costs on bills to be around £100 by 2030A batch of papers report on the latest analysis from the government's independent climate advisors of the impact of policies to cut emissions on bills.&nbsp;The&nbsp;FT reports&nbsp;that the total cost of taxes on carbon, subsidies for clean energy and support for energy efficiency will double from £115 to £215 per household by 2030 but that average bills could remain roughly where they are due, in part, to the efficiency measures some of those policies pay for.The&nbsp;BBC picks up&nbsp;on a new aspect of the CCC's analysis which looked at the distribution of energy bill costs arguing that poor families will need additional support with energy bill costs in future. It also noted the CCC's claim that 80% of the increase in bills since 2004 was not related to low-carbon policies. Some new maths here too. Clean energy policies will add 36p a day to household bills by 2030.The&nbsp;Telegraph takes the BBC's&nbsp;point a little further noting that homes with electric heating (which also tend to be homes with less well off occupants) will have to pay £360 a year in green levies by 2030, reporting the CCC's call for additional support to help these households.&nbsp;Carbon Brief moves on beyond 2030 entirely noting the CCC's claim that after that point investments in low-carbon energy will actually lead to lower energy costs. All of these stories are based on the same information, of course, so perhaps a chart would help here:In related news the BBC (and others)&nbsp;report that millions of energy customers who have money left in old accounts are again being encouraged to reclaim it through an industry website and&nbsp;The Times&nbsp;reports the new boss of energy regulator Ofgem's claim that consumers are still being overcharged for their energy bills because they've not switched supplier.&nbsp;2) Oil continues to fall as US shale, Solar face pinchAs oil prices&nbsp;resumed their fall Iranian officials have warned (it's a warning from their viewpoint anyway) that oil could reach $40 a barrel if the oil cartel OPEC continues to be divided over cutting production.The FT reports that&nbsp;evidence has started to emerge that the fall in oil prices is having an impact on the US shale industry, but they are not the only ones feeling the pinch.&nbsp;Forbes reports that a batch of solar stocks&nbsp;have started to fall sharply on concern that lower oil prices could impact demand for clean energy.&nbsp;In other news- BP to face $1bn restructuring charge- Reindeers dying in Britain because climate too warm- Hungary and Russia confirm nuclear deal- Chinese nuclear operator floats on exchange - shares boost by 24%Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-daily-dispatch-65#comments News energy Wed, 10 Dec 2014 10:16:48 +0000 damiankahya 368426 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Damian's daily dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-daily-dispatch-64 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> COP Notes: What's going on with "carbon neutrality" and will the UK sign up?As the summit progresses a groundswell of support&nbsp;has developed in favour of including in the final text a statement of bold ambition, grounded in the science of climate change, to ensure the world is carbon neutral by 2050. The UK seems unsure whether to push this - but is it already the government's position?In other news from Lima, in a major policy&nbsp;U-turn Australia has decided to give money to the global clean climate fund.&nbsp;Top stories1) Climate advisors: Clean energy costs on bills to be around £100 by 2030A batch of papers report on the latest analysis from the government's independent climate advisors of the impact of policies to cut emissions on bills.&nbsp;The&nbsp;FT reports&nbsp;that the total cost of taxes on carbon, subsidies for clean energy and support for energy efficiency will double from £115 to £215 per household by 2030 but that average bills could remain roughly where they are due, in part, to the efficiency measures some of those policies pay for.The&nbsp;BBC picks up&nbsp;on a new aspect of the CCC's analysis which looked at the distribution of energy bill costs arguing that poor families will need additional support with energy bill costs in future. It also noted the CCC's claim that 80% of the increase in bills since 2004 was not related to low-carbon policies. Some new maths here too. Clean energy policies will add 36p a day to household bills by 2030.The&nbsp;Telegraph takes the BBC's&nbsp;point a little further noting that homes with electric heating (which also tend to be homes with less well off occupants) will have to pay £360 a year in green levies by 2030, reporting the CCC's call for additional support to help these households.&nbsp;Carbon Brief moves on beyond 2030 entirely noting the CCC's claim that after that point investments in low-carbon energy will actually lead to lower energy costs. All of these stories are based on the same information, of course, so perhaps a chart would help here:In related news the BBC (and others)&nbsp;report that millions of energy customers who have money left in old accounts are again being encouraged to reclaim it through an industry website and&nbsp;The Times&nbsp;reports the new boss of energy regulator Ofgem's claim that consumers are still being overcharged for their energy bills because they've not switched supplier.&nbsp;2) Oil continues to fall as US shale, Solar face pinchAs oil prices&nbsp;resumed their fall Iranian officials have warned (it's a warning from their viewpoint anyway) that oil could reach $40 a barrel if the oil cartel OPEC continues to be divided over cutting production.The FT reports that&nbsp;evidence has started to emerge that the fall in oil prices is having an impact on the US shale industry, but they are not the only ones feeling the pinch.&nbsp;Forbes reports that a batch of solar stocks&nbsp;have started to fall sharply on concern that lower oil prices could impact demand for clean energy.&nbsp;In other news- BP to face $1bn restructuring charge- Reindeers dying in Britain because climate too warm- Hungary and Russia confirm nuclear deal- Chinese nuclear operator floats on exchange - shares boost by 24%Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-daily-dispatch-64#comments News energy Wed, 10 Dec 2014 10:16:15 +0000 damiankahya 368425 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Energydesk Daily Dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-54 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 1) Oil &amp; UK energy: Energy shares plummet with crude prices (again) as BP loses court case (again)&nbsp;Bloomberg (and everyone else)&nbsp;reports that&nbsp;U.S. stock indexes slid from records amid continued selling of energy producers as crude oil sank to a five-year low. The news comes as the&nbsp;US Supreme Court rejected&nbsp;BP's&nbsp;legal challenge to a compensation deal over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.The plummeting price of crude won't just hit oil majors though (see above).&nbsp;Platts asks what impact&nbsp;it will have on the UK's energy market reforms which - it says - were predicated on an assumption of $100 a barrel oil."If oil sustains its recent low levels, or continues to fall (see below), this could lead to lower gas and electricity prices too. It would also mean that investments in new nuclear and renewable generation might need to be justified on environmental terms alone, rather than with the prospect of lower household bills," said the newswire.&nbsp;2) India: State coal giant&nbsp;invests in solarNow this is hedging your bets.&nbsp;India's Economic Times reports that&nbsp;Coal India has signed an agreement with Solar Energy Corporation&nbsp;of India "for setting up of solar power plants of total 1000 MW capacity in different parts of the country.""Recently, CIL (Coal India) has signed MoU with Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) to install 1,000 MW solar power plants in the solar parks in different parts of India including Andhra Pradesh and Telengana to be identified by SECI, in a phased manner," Coal and Power Minister Piyush Goyal said in a written reply to the Rajya Sabha, the paper reports.It comes amidst something of a solar boom in India.&nbsp;Clean Technica reports that India's largest solar company&nbsp;- NTPC ltd -&nbsp;&nbsp;recently announced that it has signed another agreement to set up&nbsp;a large-scale&nbsp;solar power plant&nbsp;in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The installed capacity of the project will be 375 MW and will require a total investment of ₹3,000 crore ($500 million).3) China: Limited impact from US-China deal amidst further criticismAn analysis by&nbsp;Climate tracker has&nbsp;found&nbsp;that global temperatures will rise by less than previously forecast&nbsp;as a result of the deal between the US and China on climate."The effect of these new announcements is between 0.2 and 0.4 degrees lower warming than in&nbsp;earlier assessments of global ambition, reducing the projected warming to 2.9-3.1oC." the report claims.&nbsp;The report comes as&nbsp;Business Insider&nbsp;takes it's own look at the numbers and suggests it will be very hard to keep global warming within 2 degrees. Similar analysis has led many NGOs to argue a global must leave room for major emitters to review their pledges at regular intervals.However the agreement has come under further attack in the US&nbsp;after China rejected provisions in&nbsp;in global climate negotiations&nbsp;which would subject its carbon emissions to external scrutiny.&nbsp;4) Global: Australia loses in global climate rankings, UK comes third, Germany 58th (it's a bit of an odd ranking)Australia was the worst performing industrial&nbsp;country in terms of climate change in 2014, a new report has found.&nbsp;It ranked Denmark as the best performing nation, followed by Sweden and the UK.In contrast to previous years, Germany scored average results in an annual climate change study -&nbsp;Euractiv reports&nbsp;-&nbsp;&nbsp;among the world’s 58 largest CO2 emitters, it ranked 22nd.“The so-called ‘Energiewende dilemma’ – the considerable increase in coal power generation alongside simultaneous expansion of renewable energies – has been damaging Germany’s climate balance,” explained Jan Burck of Germanwatch, which carried out the research, adding the recent climate action package could change the situation significantly.&nbsp;In other news:- UK solar to reach&nbsp;cost parity within&nbsp;a decade as wind farms power&nbsp;107% of Scotland's homes&nbsp;(ed: there's a maths issue here).- Good read:&nbsp;How coal firm uses arguments about helping&nbsp;the poor&nbsp;-&nbsp;EU heatwaves more likely with climate change- Chinese press reports that&nbsp;Hinkley Point could be a "game changer" for China's role in global infrastructure projects&nbsp;Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-54#comments News energy Tue, 09 Dec 2014 09:25:13 +0000 damiankahya 368386 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Damian's weekend dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-weekend-dispatch-1 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Damian Kahya </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 1) Briefing: Lima climate talksRuth Davis updates&nbsp;us on week one of this year's climate summit - where she may, or may not, have seen the basis for a new global treaty and The Telegraph has its own&nbsp;"Lima for Dummies", which UK&nbsp;minister Amber Rudd will presumably need,&nbsp;when she is finally able to go.&nbsp;The talks come amidst domestic pressure for some of the biggest negotiators. Republicans in the US have criticised the US-China climate deal as one sided, though it was recently&nbsp;backed by US environmental regulators. In India the government has been accused of being wrongfooted by the same deal amidst reports it is to&nbsp;introduce new climate legislation.Back at the summit&nbsp;Bloomberg reports&nbsp;that Typhoon Hagupit has emphasised a rift in the talks as countries move towards agreeing what details will be included in climate pledges whilst Australia has been accused of&nbsp;trying to wreck&nbsp;the talks by insisting on a legally binding deal“We’ll see the major tensions playing out,” Liz Gallagher, senior adviser to the policy analyst E3G, said in an interview. “Finance will be the sticking point because it crosses some large red lines of what the U.S. and EU can do.”&nbsp;2) Briefing:&nbsp;Climate talks and low oil price could hit coal, oil majors amidst UK job cutsThe&nbsp;FT reports&nbsp;that "ExxonMobil&nbsp;and&nbsp;Shell&nbsp;would cease to exist in their current forms in 35 years under measures UN negotiators are considering for a legally binding global&nbsp;climate pact&nbsp;to be sealed in Paris next year."The analysis comes as&nbsp;UK Energy Secretary, Ed Davey,&nbsp;warns pension funds against investing in fossil fuel firms and&nbsp;BP announces significant UK&nbsp;job cuts partially in response to the plunging global oil price.&nbsp;But, if the world does act on climate change, oil should be around longer than some fuels.&nbsp;In the Telegraph Geoff Lean looks at China's pledge to cap coal use in 6 years asking&nbsp;"Is this the End of Coal?". Will this story&nbsp;survive an uptick in the prices of oil and coal? Probably not.&nbsp;3) Labour pledge to tighten UK fracking rulesThe FT's political editor, Jim Pickard, reports that Labour will harden it's stance on fracking in the UK today.Labour shadow ministers "will call for a presumption against fracking on protected land such as areas of outstanding natural beauty, national parks and sites of special scientific interest.""Other amendments will require greater openness about the fluids used in fracking, and the methane gas emissions that may result from the process, as well as mandating independent well inspections," the FT reports.The announcement comes amidst continuing conflicting reports about the benefits and perceived risks of shale gas and calls for greater research.&nbsp;Today's Guardian reported that people who live near fracking operations should be monitored for chemical contaminants and health problems, according to US researchers who surveyed the risks posed by substances used in the process.“We desperately need biomonitoring data from these people. What are people actually exposed to? What are the blood levels of people living in these areas? What are the levels in the workers?” said Susan Nagel from the University of MIssouri.4) Tech update: Solar underpants, energy from a box and batteries break the utilitiesLook, let's not pretend this is news, this is just geeking out over tech.&nbsp;The Telegraph&nbsp;claims a "new flexible solar cloth could soon be on a roof near you". The company claims it could power the national grid 3 times over... of course.&nbsp;“I made a pair of solar underpants for a Japanese businessman,” says media friendly boss Perry&nbsp;Carroll. “He gave them to his boss with the note, 'I told you the sun shone out of my backside’.”Not to be outdone&nbsp;The Guardian&nbsp;asks "What if hot air could be turned into electricity?". Now, you may say this is exactly what most power plants already do, but anyway,&nbsp;apparently the folks at&nbsp;Alphabet Energy "have a&nbsp;new&nbsp;thermoelectric material which can turn waste heat – such as that from car exhausts and industry – into usable electric power more cheaply and efficiently than ever".And what if electricity could be stored cheaply near where it is produced?&nbsp;Bloomberg reports from Tesla's Giga Factory which, it claims, is spooking US power majors because of&nbsp;“The mortal threat that ever cheaper on-site renewables pose."“That is an unregulated product you can buy at Home Depot that leaves the old business model with no place to hide," says Amory Lovins, a US energy consultant the wire tracked down to back up the story.&nbsp;In other (actual) news:- Somalia invites energy companies to hunt for oil- Chinese imports join coil, oil use in... falling. No sign of a downturn here, move along now...- Finland gives go-ahead (again) to Russian nuclear projectAnd from Energydesk last week (we didn't email you on Friday, sorry)-&nbsp;What does the crashing oil price mean for fracking? Zachery Davies Boren takes a look-&nbsp;Investors face falling profits as cost of coal in India set to rise-&nbsp;How Russia's coal firms could push Ukraine into blackouts-&nbsp;Q&amp;A on Eon's decision to split itself in two&nbsp;(it just agreed to negotiate over nuclear costs).- And our&nbsp;investigation into how coal mining&nbsp;in Indonesia's rain forests could pollute ecosystems with acid water.&nbsp;Been forwarded this email? Sign up here </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/damians-weekend-dispatch-1#comments News energy Mon, 08 Dec 2014 09:01:37 +0000 damiankahya 368356 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk The Paris agreement: from Epic to Haiku? http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/analysis/paris-agreement-epic-haiku <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ruth Davis </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> This&nbsp;23-page document could provide the first glimpses of what will become a new global climate treaty. But whether this is the basis for a new deal, and how such a deal will actually be negotiated, is a hot topic.&nbsp;Many countries favour a negotiation process that involves working line by line through a draft text consisting of all the options proposed by countries on every topic.This has the great advantage of giving a voice to every nation, whatever their size and wealth, and creates the potential for an agreement that is fully "owned" by all those who sign it. For this reason some would argue that it is also the best way of avoiding a deal that merely rubber stamps the G2&nbsp;China–US bilateral plan&nbsp;announced last month – a plan which whilst it is of massive political significance, is nowhere near ambitious enough on its own to avoid devastating changes to the world’s climate.The disadvantage of this approach is that without extraordinary discipline and a will to come to a conclusion, it can rapidly lead to a text of baroque proportions –&nbsp;perhaps running to hundreds of pages – which is very difficult to whittle down into a document short enough for leaders to agree on and sign. Such a text, along with all the complex individual negotiations it spawns, is also the perfect playground for any country or group of countries wanting to delay action, without being seen openly to do so.&nbsp;Draft text&nbsp;in the run up to Copenhagen ran to nearly 200 pages.The alternative way of working – with key themes and proposals synthesised into a possible text by the Chairs of the negotiations –&nbsp;is potentially more streamlined and better able to capture key areas of agreement. But it is also fraught with difficulties. Countries often feel as if their issues have not been fully represented. The Chairs can rapidly acquire a reputation for bias towards one group or another. Texts of this kind are suspected of being "cooked up" in closed rooms by a few powerful players and imposed on the rest – the specific&nbsp;accusation&nbsp;levelled at the "Danish text" introduced by the President of the now notorious climate conference in Copenhagen.The tension between the two approaches (and many variants of them) can already been felt here in in Lima, where there is unrest in many delegations about the failure of the current working documents to capture proposals submitted in the run up to the talks, and delays in getting down to specific negotiations on text.&nbsp;So we should pity the poor diplomats who have to tiptoe between these hazards on their way to Paris.The solution may lie in deftly managed bottom-up consensus-building, creating confidence for the moment when a very long list of proposals needs to be distilled into a more manageable-sized agreement. But this kind of diplomatic alchemy is not for beginners.The&nbsp;current Co-Chairs&nbsp;of the negotiation will soon be stepping down –&nbsp;I would imagine with some relief.&nbsp; Discussions are underway about their replacements. Wherever they hail from, let’s hope they have open minds, sharp wits and strong hearts –&nbsp;and that they are able to earn the trust of the countries they are helping to steer towards a deal. If they manage it, they will have earned our gratitude many times over. </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/analysis/paris-agreement-epic-haiku#comments Analysis energy Thu, 04 Dec 2014 16:27:51 +0000 habelvik 368286 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk Energydesk Daily Dispatch http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-53 <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-content"><legend>Content</legend><div class="field field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Christine Ottery </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> On EnergydeskWe report on an investigation finding&nbsp;that the booming coal mining industry in South Kalimantan (otherwise known as Borneo) has been detrimental to water quality - water running off the open cast mines can become acidic and laced with heavy metals. This has impacts on people and the environment.Check out our video, narrated by Damian Kayha, with drone footage of the area studied.This story is the second in a series looking at how the coal industry affects water - the first looked at&nbsp;coal mining at the source of the Yellow River in China.Top 3 stories1) Germany targets energy savings and coal plants&nbsp;to reduce emissionsGermany announced yesterday an energy package to help the country meet its 2020 climate targets.The plan calls on Germans to cut an additional 62 million to 78 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions across various sectors,&nbsp;according to the NYT. &nbsp;Reuters reports&nbsp;22 million tonnes of this needs to come from the power sector, meaning the closure of about 8 coal plants.The package includes an energy efficiency program, with 3 billion euros, or $3.7 billion, in tax breaks and other incentives.According to analysis from Business Green, domestic energy efficiency, electric cars, and renewables all set to benefit from the package, which it suggests would help mobilise €40bn of investment by 2018.The announcement came against the backdrop of ongoing climate talks in Lima, Peru, and just days after German utility&nbsp;E.On said it was going to split its business in two&nbsp;- a move that has been interpreted by some as a boost to renewables.2) Ukraine crisis sanctions considered againReuters writes that&nbsp;US and EU leaders have been working yesterday to pledge to work together on sanctions and on strengthening the energy security of Europe and Ukraine, as they seek to present a united front to Russia, a draft document said.Meanwhile, Russia has dropped its South Stream pipeline project to supply gas to the EU, but plans to link up with Turkey to deliver gas to them instead.&nbsp;But WSJ says the price of energy—and oil in particular—is driving the two countries’ outlooks apart.In related news, an accident at a nuclear power plant in Zaporizhzhya in southeastern Ukraine poses no danger to health or the environment, energy authorities said on Wednesday,&nbsp;Reuters reports.3) Climate funding goes to coal plants, investigation findsClose to $1 billion in funds meant to finance global climate-mitigation projects is going toward the construction of power plants fired by coal&nbsp;according&nbsp;to an Associated Press investigation.The findings highlight the lack of rules designed to steer the United Nations’ ‘climate finance’ initiative, through which rich countries funnel money to poor countries to help tackle global warming.In other newsCarbon Brief sets&nbsp;out the climate and energy-related announcements from yesterday’s Autumn Statement.UK solar could be subsidy free by 2020, study claims- But researchers warn plans to rapidly reduce subsidies could "seriously damage" the industry,&nbsp;writes Business Green.The FT reports&nbsp;the crisis in Scotland’s embryonic wave energy sector has deepened with an announcement by leading developer Aquamarine Power that it will lay off all but its core staff - &nbsp;less than two weeks after the&nbsp;collapse&nbsp;of rival wave energy pioneer Pelamis into administration.A government-appointed panel rejected calls for Norway’s $870 billion wealth fund to sell out of coal and other fossil fuels producers,&nbsp;Bloomberg reports.Five mining companies, including an international consortium, have said they would bid to develop Mongolia’s giant Tavan Tolgoi coal project - the largest deposit of high-grade coking coal in the world. </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.greenpeace.org.uk/newsdesk/energy/news/energydesk-daily-dispatch-53#comments News energy Thu, 04 Dec 2014 08:43:44 +0000 christine_ottery 368275 at http://www.greenpeace.org.uk