Oceans

Blackfish: when whales turn killer

Posted by Willie — 24 July 2013 at 4:24pm - Comments
An orca performing
All rights reserved. Credit: Dogwoof
Being held in captivity can chop 50-60 years from a killer whale's life expectancy

When I was little, I can vaguely remember a trip to Blair Drummond Safari Park for my birthday. This was back in the days when the world was black and white, Starburst was called Opal Fruits, and they still had dolphins in captivity in the UK. I don’t remember much, but I know we watched a dolphin ‘show’ with balls and hoops and clapping and ‘ooh-ing’.

You can’t see a dolphin in the UK doing that today. That is progress.

'No one owns the fish of the sea': landmark ruling prevents ocean privatisation

Posted by Ariana Densham — 10 July 2013 at 10:32am - Comments
Sustainably caught fish in Hastings
All rights reserved. Credit: David Sandison / Greenpeace
The High Court ruling prevents big business from claiming ownership of fish stocks

This morning I was at the High Court in central London where a historic ruling was handed down on who controls the UK's right to fish.

An attempt by big fishing firms to protect their decades-long stranglehold on Britain’s fish was resoundingly defeated in court. The judgement gives back control of our seas to the public and the UK government, rather than big industry.

Exposed: Iceland's whale hunt (graphic images)

Posted by jamess — 19 June 2013 at 5:35pm - Comments
Fin whale caught by an Icelandic whaling ship
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Iceland is once again undermining the global ban on commercial whaling

Sorry these pictures are grim, but it's important we get the message out.

This morning, one of our undercover photographers sent pictures showing a magnificent fin whale being harpooned and diced up by an Icelandic ship.

Together we have the power to protect the oceans

Posted by Joel Stewart — 8 June 2013 at 1:26pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Redondo/Greenpeace
The Arctic Sunrise arrives in London for World Oceans Day

In more than three decades at sea, I have had the pleasure to sail across the world’s oceans; I have had the privilege to witness ocean life in a way that few others can; I have experienced the magic and mystery of some of the planet’s biggest, smallest, most beautiful and strangest creatures. From blue whales to the tiniest seahorses and almost everything in between!

Making waves on the long road to fishing reform

Posted by simon clydesdale — 30 May 2013 at 4:07pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Reynaers/Greenpeace
A petition of over 100,000 paper and digital paper boats is delivered to the EU Irish Presidency ahead of crucial CFP meetings

Listen. Can you hear it? No? Come closer. There. The fat CFP lady is beginning to sing.

Turtle recall

Posted by Willie — 23 May 2013 at 9:00am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Hilton/Greenpeace
An Olive Ridley turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) swims in the open blue ocean of the Pacific.

When I heard it was World Turtle Day, I hatched a plan. I know that to an international audience ‘turtle’ covers  a multitude of reptile species, but rather than getting all Queens’ English-y over what is a tortoise, a terrapin or a turtle, I thought this was a good opportunity to focus in on the seven amazing species that roam our oceans – the sea turtles.

Top 10 weird wildlife: immortal jellyfish, gender-swapping fish and pink dolphins

Posted by Willie — 22 May 2013 at 3:09pm - Comments

Today is International Day for Biological Diversity. An opportunity to celebrate and wonder at the amazingly diverse variety of species we share the planet with. This year it has a water theme, so we’ve been having some fun over on Twitter, and here’s our pick of the weirdest and most wondrous watery wildlife you definitely need to know about.

Deal or no deal on Europe's fishing laws?

Posted by Willie — 20 May 2013 at 5:47pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Will politicians net a fair fishing deal?

While considering how to write a blog on the latest developments on Europe’s bumpy road to fisheries reform, I decided to take a step back in time. Eleven months ago I wrote this blog explaining where the discussions were at, what was still on the table, and outlining a number of areas of concern.

It’s crunch time (again) for Europe’s fish ministers

Posted by Willie — 13 May 2013 at 12:56pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
A full page ad calls for Benyon to support sustainable fishing

If you listen to Ronan Keating much (I don’t) – you’d be familiar with the concept that Life is a Rollercoaster.

But for some of us, it’s a bit more accurate to liken the process of reforming Europe’s failed fish laws to that particular fun-fair ride : full of twists and turns, highs and lows, moments of hopeful elation, followed by moments of abject panic and fear. And sometimes making us reach for a sick bag.

Championing small-scale fishermen in court battle for fairer quotas

Posted by Ariana Densham — 1 May 2013 at 11:28am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Small-scale fishermen outside the Royal Courts of Justice

Imagine if someone claimed ownership of a percentage of the sparrows in the sky or a share of the deer in our forests? Would this seem absurd to you? I agree.

Unbelievably, this is now set to be the heart of an unprecedented court battle – except that it’s over who ultimately controls the UK’s fishing quota, and therefore who 'owns' the fish in our seas. 

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