Oceans

Iceland's fin whale hunt cancelled for 2016

Posted by Willie — 25 February 2016 at 1:24pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Modrow/Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists blockade whale meat shipment in port of Hamburg.

No endangered fin whales will be hunted in Iceland this year.

This is great news. Word today from colleagues in Iceland, and now reports in both Icelandic and English-language media confirm that the planned hunt for fin whales will not happen this summer. The man behind that whaling is claiming that he’s stopping because of ‘hindrances’ in exporting the meat. That’s great news for whales, and everyone who has been opposing this needless, senseless hunt.

World's oldest wild bird has a new chick - but is it a doomed messenger in an increasingly polluted ocean?

Posted by Willie — 16 February 2016 at 2:31pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: https://www.facebook.com/hokuleawwv
World's oldest wild bird, Laysan albatross Wisdom & chick | https://www.facebook.com/hokuleawwv

Imagine becoming a parent at the age of 65. It might seem miraculous but that is what has happened to the world’s oldest known wild bird, an Albatross living on an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

A tale of two tunas

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 15 February 2016 at 3:39pm - Comments
Fish gather under Fish Aggregating Device (FAD)
All rights reserved. Credit: © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
All kinds of marine life gather under so-called "Fish Aggregating Devices" - or "FADs" - and are then scooped up in huge fishing nets

Imagine a world where there are two tuna companies called John West.

Both are the number one brand in their market. Both faced Greenpeace campaigns and, as a consequence, made commitments to sell 100% sustainably-caught tuna by the end of 2016.

Now imagine one John West has kept its promise to consumers. And the other John West has broken it.

This isn’t some fantasy world. It’s very real. And it’s not good news for UK consumers...

Why do whales strand on beaches?

Posted by Willie — 26 January 2016 at 1:19pm - Comments
Sperm whales washed up on skegness beach
All rights reserved. Credit: Lee Swift
Sperm whales washed up on a Skegness beach

Shocking and sad images have been all over the media in the past few days as some massive sperm whales have washed up dead on British beaches. Normally humans and these deep water leviathans live far apart, so it’s understandable that we are surprised and distraught to encounter them like this. But why does it happen? And what can you do?

5 Small Things That Explain The Big Problem with Microbeads

Posted by India Thorogood — 18 January 2016 at 4:27pm - Comments

Wondering how you can get your friends to bin the dodgy plastic face scrubs? Want to get them to sign our petition to David Cameron? Here's 5 things that'll explain it all in no time at all.

1. This straight to the point cartoon:

What are microbeads and why should we ban them?

Posted by India Thorogood — 14 January 2016 at 12:57pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Washed your face with an exfoliating face scrub recently? Brushed your teeth with some smooth minty toothpaste? Unfortunately then, you may have unknowingly smothered gross, polluting plastic on your body. While fancy adverts lead us to believe these products are good for us -  both beauty experts and ethical campaigners are now criticising the inclusion of tiny pieces of plastic called microbeads.

New Year's plastic resolution: 5 simple ways to help the ocean.

Posted by Willie — 7 January 2016 at 12:22pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Poldhu Beach Watcher/BBC News

The New Year’s storms have brought a lurid, unmissable reminder to UK beaches, with thousands of bright pink detergent bottles being churned up by the sea. As waves of highly-visible plastic trash hit British beaches, it’s a timely reminder of a much bigger problem: we are turning our oceans into plastic soup. It’s been estimated recently that about EIGHT MILLION TONNES of plastic ends up in the ocean each year.

Cheap seafood costs too much in human suffering

Posted by Willie — 14 December 2015 at 1:09pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Dita Alangkara/Associated Press
Children and teenagers sit together to be registered by officials during a raid on a shrimp shed in Samut Sakhon, Thailand.

About 8 years ago, I had the joy of doing a live news interview from a fish processing factory in Grimsby. Being in a fish processing factory in Grimsby was fine, it was wearing a hair net on national TV that wasn’t.

The story being discussed was seafood brand Young’s decision to ship UK-caught shrimp all the way to Thailand and back, a move that was ‘better’ in terms of CO2 emissions, and cheaper for consumers.

But what price do we pay for cheap seafood?

In pictures: A good catch, celebrate sustainable fishing on World Fisheries Day!

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 20 November 2015 at 5:21pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Pierre Baelen / Greenpeace
Local Malagasi fishing boat in the port of Diego, Madagascar.

Every year on the 21 November fishing communities around the world celebrate World Fisheries Day and remind us that we need to ensure a healthy oceans ecosystem with plenty more fish swimming in the sea. More than two-thirds of the world’s fisheries have been overfished and unsustainable fishing methods like bottom trawling or the use of FAD's (Fish Aggregation Devices) threaten to deplete fish stocks.

A Government Minister just lobbied himself

Posted by Rukayah Sarumi — 19 November 2015 at 9:14am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Janie Airey / Greenpeace
George Eustice and other parliamentary candidates back the Coastal Champions campaign in April 2015

The Fisheries Minister George Eustice just received a petition signed by himself, calling on himself to implement the measures George Eustice believes that George Eustice should take in redistributing fishing quota to small, sustainable, fishing vessels.

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