Princes

Princes responds to your emails but not your demands for sustainable tuna

Posted by jossg — 20 January 2011 at 7:12pm - Comments
Turtle and FAD in East Pacific Ocean
All rights reserved. Credit: Alex Hofford / Greenpeace

Update, 9 March 2011: both Princes and Asda have committed to removing tuna caught using fish aggregating devices in combination with purse seine nets from their supply chains by 2014. Read more >>

Princes sent out a message to almost 18,000 of you who emailed the company asking them to stop using fishing methods that kill sharks, turtles, dolphins and other fish in order to fill their cans with tuna.

I've taken the letter apart to explain what their response really means. The bottom line is they're still bottom of the tuna league.

Princes changes tuna labels but not its policies

Posted by jamie — 14 January 2011 at 6:44pm - Comments

So, what's been going on since our tinned tuna league table was released on an expectant world at the weekend? Quite a bit as it happens and already you've helped us score another small but vital victory over the worst of the tuna companies, Princes.

Tesco escapes last place in new tinned tuna league table with spectacular policy u-turn

Posted by jamie — 9 January 2011 at 10:40am - Comments
Tesco was bottom of our tinned tuna league table before a nifty u-turn
All rights reserved. Credit: Cobb / Greenpeace
Tesco was bottom of our tinned tuna league table before a nifty u-turn

Update, 9 March 2011: both Princes and Asda have committed to removing tuna caught using fish aggregating devices in combination with purse seine nets from their supply chains by 2014. Read more >>

Having got wind of our new tinned tuna league table (see below) and the fact that it was going to come last, Tesco has done a spectacular u-turn. After being the subject of a Greenpeace investigation, it has radically improved its policy on the fishing methods it will permit for its own-brand tuna.

Princes' tuna policy doesn't do what it says on the tin

Posted by Willie — 15 October 2010 at 10:15am - Comments

Two whole years in the making, Princes' new 'sustainable seafood statement' was supposed to address many issues. Specifically it was supposed to be explaining just what the company intended to do to drag itself from the bottom of our tinned tuna league table by explaining the measures they were implementing to ensure they were sourcing their tinned tuna responsibly.

What's lurking in your tuna sandwich?

Posted by Willie — 25 May 2010 at 4:38pm - Comments

Another tin of tuna, because we know you can't get enough of these pictures

The old saying about a can of worms, is based on the idea that once you open said can, it's impossible to get the worms back in and close it again. Who knew that was true of cans of tuna too?

But fresh from our update on some of the international branded laggards yesterday, comes some news of more developments from some of the UK retailers.

Tinned tuna industry polices itself, and it smells so fishy

Posted by Willie — 24 May 2010 at 4:17pm - Comments

There's a well-known model of how dodgy big business deals with campaigns against them. To summarise, it goes a bit like this:

  • Company X gets some bad press for doing something wrong, especially bad press if it kills lots of charismatic megafauna;
  • Company X initially retaliates saying, 'It's all lies, honest';
  • Company X then admits it isn't all lies, but comes up with some way of kicking the issue into the long grass, usually some commission or foundation (ideally with a word like 'conservation' or 'sustainable' in its title) or some interminable period of gathering research, in the hope it all blows over and people forget what they were upset about.

Are Princes cornering the market in Amazon destruction?

Posted by christian — 25 August 2009 at 4:57pm - Comments

The number 385 on the tin's stamp tells us it comes from cattle company JBS.

Food manufacturer Princes are 'big in corned beef' - that food cupboard staple with a use-by date sometime in the next millennia. In 2007, they were the third largest canned food supplier to the UK.

We've come across Prince's in the past because they sell a lot of canned tuna, but they also sell a lot of corned beef. With all of the Amazon cattle work we've been doing lately we've developed a keen interest in where they get it from, and tins of Princes corned beef are rapidly multiplying around the forest campaign team's office space.

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