Textiles

Detox hat-trick: Adidas joins Nike and Puma in ditching toxic chemicals

Posted by Eoin D — 31 August 2011 at 11:34am - Comments
Adidas is given the yellow card in Hong Kong for the use of toxic chemicals in t
All rights reserved. Credit: Clement Tang / Greenpeace
Adidas has agreed to play clean and has committed to removing toxic chemicals from its products

Adidas is going toxic-free, the company has just announced!

This is great news for our environment, rivers, and the millions of people in China and elsewhere who depend on rivers for drinking water and agriculture.

Greenpeace research reveals toxic chemicals in biggest clothing brands

Posted by Eoin D — 23 August 2011 at 3:30am - Comments
Clothing and the Global Toxic Cycle - 300 dpi
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace
Dirty Laundry: Clothing and the Global Toxic Cycle

Our latest research reveals that the clothes you are wearing may contain nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) - chemicals that are effectively banned in clothing manufacturing in Europe - which can break down in water to form nonylphenol (NP), a toxic, persistent and hormone-disrupting substance. 52 out of 78 garments from 14 global clothing, brands sold in the UK and the continent, tested positive for NPEs, including four Adidas articles.

Create a revolution in your wardrobe - part two

Posted by louise — 9 August 2011 at 2:58pm - Comments
Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy i
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy is centered on textile production.

In the second half of our tips on greening your wardrobe - to help you clean up your clothing inspired by our Detox campaign - we look at saying no to child labour, questioning distressed denim, avoiding greenwash, spring cleaning, speaking out and spreading the word.

Create a revolution in your wardrobe - part one

Posted by louise — 2 August 2011 at 5:01pm - Comments
Daily workers at a denim washing factory in Xintang, China, search wastewater fo
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Workers at a denim washing factory in Xintang, search wastewater for stones, to create stonewash denim.

Has our Detox campaign made you think about your clothes and their hidden consequences? You may already heart second hand, throwaway fashion makes you ill, and your mantra is quality not quantity. But how else can you align your sartorial and sustainable sides? Here's our first set of tips to help decrease your fashion's footprint.

Nike & Adidas: time to Detox the world’s water

Posted by louise — 13 July 2011 at 12:25pm - Comments
Detox: which big sports brands will ditch toxic polluters first?
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace
Detox: which brand will eliminate all toxic chemicals from their supply chain first?

Game on, Nike and Adidas. Greenpeace is calling you out to see which one of you is stronger on the flats, quicker on the breaks, turns faster and plays harder at a game we’re calling Detox. Who’ll be the first to take action and eliminate hazardous chemical discharges from their supply chain? Who will be the champion of a toxic-free future?

There is more than one way to save the planet

Posted by Esther Freeman — 29 March 2011 at 5:47pm - Comments
Model on the catwalk
by-nc-sa. Credit: Ammar Abd Rabbo

In response to Rachel's recent blog about taking in part in direct actions in such a male-orientated world as Greenpeace, Esther explains that you don't necessarily have to climb tall buildings to have an impact.

Some women have a touch of the Lara Croft about them, but others - no matter how hard we try - would always prefer a nice bit of cake and a day out shopping to climbing up chimneys. Not that there is anything wrong with this – after all, there is more than one way to save the planet.

The polluted secret behind jeans and bras

Posted by louise — 10 February 2011 at 5:28pm - Comments

Yesterday the Guardian featured a series of pictures showing the appalling impact that China’s growing textile industry is having on the Pearl River delta.

Syndicate content

Follow Greenpeace UK