IWC

Video: Free the Tokyo Two

Posted by bex — 4 July 2008 at 10:49am - Comments

Our activist friends, Junichi and Toru, are still behind bars: 23 days without charge after exposing a whale meat smuggling scandal.

A huge thanks to all 200,000 plus of you who've written to Japan's prime minister to free them - let's keep up the pressure!

And keep an eye on the latest count, updated hourly:


What happened at the International Whaling Commission 2016 meeting

Posted by Willie — 28 October 2016 at 3:48pm - Comments
Image of a whale's fluke (tail)
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

The International Whaling Commission meeting 2016 has just come to a close. Delegates from 64 countries spent a week discussing and debating whales, in Potoroz, Slovenia.
Greenpeace’s international team was there, and here’s a quick roundup of what happened.

Vaquita porpoise takes centre stage at Whaling Commission meeting.

Posted by Willie — 27 October 2016 at 3:25pm - Comments
Image of vaquita porpoise
All rights reserved. Credit: Tom Jefferson

Big news for a little porpoise.

Something big just happened for the tiny vaquita porpoise at the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting. The diminutive porpoise was the subject of a resolution, passed by all the countries present, urging concerted international cooperation to save the species from extinction.

Whale Fail – no new sanctuary in the South Atlantic (again).

Posted by Willie — 25 October 2016 at 9:51am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Twitter

Bad news from the 2016 International Whaling Commission meeting – as the first significant vote was another disappointment for whales and supporters of conservation. Despite getting a majority of votes in favour, the proposal to create a South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary did not pass, because it was short of the three-quarters majority needed.

10 good reasons to protect whales

Posted by Willie — 21 October 2016 at 12:42pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Kate Davison

Killing whales for food has been happening for millennia. But it was commercial whaling – turning whales into barrels of oil for profit – that led to the wholesale destruction of most of the world’s populations of big whales.

Why is everyone talking about whale poo?

Posted by Willie — 20 October 2016 at 3:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton

Whales are special. No, not for any stereotypical hippy la-la reasons, this is *science*!

Healthy oceans need lots of healthy whale populations: they keep things in balance, help disperse and mix nutrients, support entire ecosystems and help fight climate change.

Surprised? Read on…

Why the South Atlantic should be a sanctuary for whales.

Posted by Willie — 20 October 2016 at 3:34pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

One of the most significant issues being discussed and voted on at the upcoming International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting in Slovenia is the call to create a Whale Sanctuary in the South Atlantic. But what is a whale sanctuary? Why does it matter? And what’s so special about the South Atlantic?

A brief history of whales and commercial whaling

Posted by Willie — 20 October 2016 at 2:58pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton

Commercial whaling devastated the world’s biggest whale species, pushing some of them to the very brink of extinction in the early to mid 20th Century. Whaling for meat, oil, or whalebone was not a new idea, but new explosive harpoons and industrialised factory ships plundering the seas for whales had an even more catastrophic impact than what had come in centuries before.

It was the realisation that catches were declining that led to the creation, by whaling nations, of an organisation that would become the ‘International Whaling Commission’ (IWC).

International Whaling Commission meeting 2016 – what to expect.

Posted by Willie — 20 October 2016 at 1:59pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton
Sperm Whales in Sri Lanka

Delegations from global governments, and representatives from NGOs are currently on their way to Slovenia for the biennial meeting of the International Whaling Commission meeting – so here’s a quick synopsis of what to expect from the meeting:

Britons overwhelmingly opposed to ending 30 year-old commercial whaling ban

Last edited 20 October 2016 at 10:51am
20 October, 2016

London, October 20: With a 30 year-old international moratorium on hunting whales for profit under threat, new research commissioned by Greenpeace UK shows a large majority of Britons believe the UK government should take a lead in upholding the ban.

A poll by YouGov showed that 91 per cent of people believe whales should continue to have protection from being hunted.

The ban on commercial whaling is likely to be a contentious topic for some governments attending the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting in Slovenia which starts today. The UK has historically been a strong supporter of whale conservation in the IWC, and nearly 70 per cent of Britons polled agreed that the UK government should have a prominent role in ensuring the whaling ban is upheld.

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