marine reserves

Marine reserves success story: Cabo Pulmo, Mexico

Posted by Gemma Freeman — 30 August 2011 at 2:30pm - Comments
A sea lion swims near Greenpeace divers with the banner "Marine Reserves Now" in
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace / Alex Hofford
A sea lion swims near Greenpeace divers with the banner "Marine Reserves Now" in the Gulf of California

Greenpeace Mexico oceans campaigner Alejandro Olivera, reveals how the thriving 20-year old marine reserve at Cabo Pulmo, which has seen fish increase by 463 per cent in ten years to become the world's most successful, is now under threat from massive local development...

Greenpeace México oceans campaigner Alejandro Olivera onboard the Greenpeace shi
A sea lion swims near Greenpeace divers with the banner "Marine Reserves Now" in

Seas in crisis? Fix the Common Fisheries Policy

Posted by Gemma Freeman — 17 August 2011 at 4:24pm - Comments

Our seas are in peril: more than 70 per cent of Europe's fish stocks are overfished, putting our most popular species at risk if it continues. And the way Europe’s seas and fish are managed allows fleets to take two-to-three times more from our oceans than what scientists consider sustainable.

Tuna giant John West quits destructive fishing

Last edited 18 August 2011 at 10:00am

Also signs up to support Pacific marine reserves following Greenpeace campaign

26 July, 2011

London, 26th July 2011- John West today became the last of the major UK
tuna industry players to announce that they will shift to greener
fishing methods. All of the UK’s major tinned tuna companies and
supermarket own-brands have now promised to drop a fishing method which
is responsible for high levels of bycatch and have committed to no
longer sourcing tuna from within the Pacific Commons marine reserves.

John West, which produces one-third of all the tuna tins sold in the UK and is owned by the world’s largest seafood producing company Thai Union, joins UK companies Princes, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, M&S, Tesco, the Co-op and Morrisons, who have already ditched tuna fishing methods that use vast nets called ‘purse seines’ along with Fish Aggregation Devices (FADs).

Fashion and fish? Selfridges' Project Ocean is a powerful partnership

Posted by Willie — 17 May 2011 at 12:17pm - Comments
Prince Charles at the launch of Selfridges' sustainable fishing event Project Oc
All rights reserved. Credit: © Selfridges
Prince Charles at the launch of Selfridges' sustainable fishing event Project Ocean

Selfridges launched Project Ocean with a bang last week. The legendary department store's front is draped with a giant banner asking ‘No more fish in the sea?.’ Their famed Oxford Street windows are filled with installations on fish issues - grabbing attention and headlines.  And they’ve pulled in a host of celebrity supporters, from Katherine Hamnett to Elle McPherson. But that's just the start of this month long celebration of our seas...

Selfridges launch Project Ocean

Posted by Willie — 11 May 2011 at 6:00pm - Comments
Project Ocean: Selfridges celebrate, fundraise and reach out to save our seas
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace
Project Ocean: Selfridges celebrate, fundraise and reach out to save our seas

There’s a big splash on Oxford Street today as Selfridges - the world’s best department store, on the busiest shopping street - has been taken over for five weeks to help save our seas with Project Ocean.

Frank Pope celebrates marine reserves in new BBC series: Britain's Secret Seas

Guest blog: Britain's Secret Seas - by Frank Pope

Posted by Gemma Freeman — 6 May 2011 at 5:12pm - Comments
Frank Pope celebrates marine reserves in new BBC series: Britain's Secret Seas
All rights reserved. Credit: © BBC
Frank Pope celebrates marine reserves in new BBC series: Britain's Secret Seas

Ocean correspondent for the Times, and presenter of new BBC series Britain's Secret Seas (starting Sunday), Frank Pope shares his passion for our waters and why the UK needs more marine reserves now:

Everyone who's watched the stunning documentary series The Blue Planet is awestruck by the beauty and diversity of life in the ocean. But, I often felt that the spectacular colours, alien weirdness, and huge creatures featured, were filmed in a sea far different from the one that crashes against our cliffs and beaches. Boy, was I wrong.

Princes responds to your emails but not your demands for sustainable tuna

Posted by jossg — 20 January 2011 at 7:12pm - Comments
Turtle and FAD in East Pacific Ocean
All rights reserved. Credit: Alex Hofford / Greenpeace

Update, 9 March 2011: both Princes and Asda have committed to removing tuna caught using fish aggregating devices in combination with purse seine nets from their supply chains by 2014. Read more >>

Princes sent out a message to almost 18,000 of you who emailed the company asking them to stop using fishing methods that kill sharks, turtles, dolphins and other fish in order to fill their cans with tuna.

I've taken the letter apart to explain what their response really means. The bottom line is they're still bottom of the tuna league.

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