palm oil

Sumatran rhino found while forest habitat is lost

Posted by jamie — 30 March 2016 at 8:13am - Comments
Sumatran rhino found in East Kalimantan, Indonesia
All rights reserved. Credit: Ari Wibowo / WWF-Indonesia
This rhino is being moved to relative safety, but the species is still critically endangered

Good news for rhino fans: last week, researchers announced the first live encounter with a Sumatran rhino in Borneo for over 40 years. But the human pressures that have pushed this species to the brink of extinction are still very much in play.

Palm oil: who's still trashing forests?

Posted by Annisa Rahmawati — 3 March 2016 at 10:39am - Comments
A crime scene: burned peatland and forest remains, planted with oil palm
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

How 'clean' is the palm oil used by major brands around the world? Today, we're releasing the results of our investigation into which companies are keeping promises to stop deforestation in Indonesia for palm oil. Take a look now to see who's keeping up - and who's lagging way behind.

Cutting Deforestation out of the Palm Oil Supply Chain - Company Scorecard

Last edited 3 March 2016 at 10:13am
Publication date: 
3 March, 2016

In recent years, the world’s biggest companies have woken up to the environmental costs associated with palm oil and the other commodities they buy. Nowhere are those costs more evident than in Indonesia, which has lost 31 million hectares of forest, an area almost the size of Germany, since 1990.

In 2015, Indonesia was wracked by the worst forest fires for almost twenty years. The disaster, the result of decades of forest and peatland destruction, thrust Indonesia’s plantation industries into the global spotlight.

Download the report:

Indonesia fires: "I'm tired of being made sick by this smoke"

Posted by Rahmi Carolina — 29 October 2015 at 12:44pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Ardiles Rante / Greenpeace

When I was young my friends and I would visit our local river, just a short walk from our small town in Pangkalan Kerinci, upstream of Riau's peatland coast in Sumatra. On days when we needed to cool down from the heat, we would spend hours swimming and getting lost in the shade of the trees, chasing birds and sleeping.

Choked in smoke - living in the thick of Indonesia’s haze

Posted by ZamZami — 25 September 2015 at 3:31pm - Comments
A Greenpeace investigator documents fire on recently cleared peatland
All rights reserved. Credit: Ifansasti/Greenpeace
Smoke caused by forest fires and peatland destruction, is covering about 80% of Sumatra, Indonesia. And it seems like no matter how far you try to escape, the smoke follows.

My wife and daughter should be at our home in Pekanbaru, Riau on the east of Sumatra right now. It’s been more than a month since we moved, or rather escaped to my parent’s house in West Sumatra. But like a dark cloud over my head I’ve since discovered that wherever I go, smoke follows.

Palm oil companies say they'll put forest destruction on hold. But what happens next?

Posted by Annisa Rahmawati — 19 September 2014 at 3:25pm - Comments
by-nc. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti / Greenpeace
Are palm oil companies serious about ending deforestation like this?

Some of the world’s biggest palm oil companies have suspended their forest destruction. Is this a ceasefire or the end of their war on forests?

There's nothing sustainable about destroying forests for palm oil

Posted by Richardg — 16 July 2014 at 10:52am - Comments
by-nc. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti / Greenpeace
Deforestation for palm oil

Some of the biggest companies in the palm oil industry just launched the Sustainable Palm Oil Manifesto. They say its a step forward - but we say it's greenwash that won't stop them trashing Indonesia's rainforests.

No more tears for tigers as Johnson & Johnson cleans up its palm oil

Posted by Richardg — 6 May 2014 at 10:21am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: UNKNOWN

On Friday, Johnson & Johnson announced it would stop buying palm oil from companies destroying the rainforest. Now the onus is on the palm oil industry as a whole to leave its forest destruction behind.

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