fads

Skipjack Tuna in East Pacific Ocean
Skipjack Tuna in East Pacific Ocean

Name that tuna

Posted by Willie — 30 April 2014 at 1:51pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Willie Mackenzie / Greenpeace

Tuna are fish, and they are wild animals. But to many people, they are simply understood as food. It can be a bit confusing when the short hand of ‘tuna’ is used, as it covers a whole family of species, from the relatively-tiddly and widespread skipjack, right up to the majestic but beleaguered bluefins.

Breaking: Tesco backs down and Oriental & Pacific cleans up

Posted by Ariana Densham — 10 April 2014 at 1:27pm - Comments
Olive Ridley turtle in the Pacific Ocean
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
Olive Ridley turtle in the Pacific Ocean

I’m so happy to announce that after we released our 2014 tuna league table, and after all your emails, tweets and calls to Tesco over the last few weeks – we have a fantastic victory. The manufacturer of Oriental & Pacific tuna has agreed to our demands. This means that fewer sharks, turtles and rays will be killed as a result of the method used to fish this tuna.

"Why are sharks, turtles and rays more important than tuna?"

Posted by Willie — 20 March 2014 at 11:32am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Willie Mackenzie / Greenpeace
Is this shark more important than the other fish?

Here’s a question which has cropped up from some supporters about our work on tinned tuna.

‘Why are sharks, turtles and rays more important than tuna?’

Dirty Tuna, Tesco, Oriental & Pacific, Greenpeace Oceans Campaign, Purse Seining
Dirty Tuna, Tesco, Oriental & Pacific, Greenpeace Oceans Campaign, Purse Seining
Dirty Tuna, Tesco, Oriental & Pacific, Greenpeace Oceans Campaign, Purse Seining

The Italian Job: reeling in the Italian tuna industry

Posted by simon clydesdale — 9 March 2012 at 1:56pm - Comments
Tuna and bycatch caught in the east Pacific
All rights reserved. Credit: Alex Hofford/Greenpeace
Tuna and bycatch caught in the east Pacific

The sands in the tuna campaign have shifted again, and the oceans and tuna will ultimately be better off for it. Our Italian colleagues have just announced that the local tinned tuna brand Mareblu has committed to stop using Fads (fish aggregation devices) - the destructive marine minefields that have been blighting the oceans for decades.

Tuna bluewash? Bolton’s fishy commitments

Posted by simon clydesdale — 30 January 2012 at 1:19pm - Comments
A Greenpeace activist cuts the lines on a fish aggregating device (FAD) - curren
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace / Paul Hilton
Tuna giant Bolton says it will be '100% sustainable' by 2017, but how?

After the huge success of our UK tinned tuna campaign, described by the Independent as "one of the most successful environmental campaigns in years", it was great to hear a big European tuna brand - Bolton commit to completely clean up its act.

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