fads

2016 Tuna Guide

Last edited 14 September 2016 at 11:41am

Taking Action on Tuna

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 27 June 2016 at 3:04pm - Comments

Right now, only two per cent of John West tuna is sustainably caught. The rest is sourced from suppliers who use indiscriminate 'fish aggregation devices' (FADs), which see turtles and sharks killed as bycatch. What's happening out at sea – and being sold in our shops – is having a devastating toll on the marine environment. This is why all of us are so determined to transform the tuna industry.


Taking 400,000 people on a trip to the Indian Ocean

Posted by Tom Lowe — 1 June 2016 at 3:18pm - Comments
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose/ Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists confront supply vessel Explorer II by blacking out their lights with eco-paint

If John West’s owner Thai Union doesn’t start protecting the oceans and those who work on them, we’ll continue to shut down their supply chains, explains Tom Lowe, who has just returned from the Greenpeace ship the Esperanza’s tour of the Indian Ocean.

Three ways you can tell Sainsbury's to drop John West!

Posted by alice.hunter — 31 May 2016 at 5:11pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose/Greenpeace
John West tuna is caught using unsustainable fishing devices

We’ve sent thousands of emails, hundreds of tweets and inundated their Customer Service phone line with calls - but Sainsbury’s still won’t speak out against unsustainable fishing.

Behind The Lens

Posted by MeenaRajput — 31 May 2016 at 2:44pm - Comments

Photographer, Will Rose, joined Greenpeace activists on an expedition to the Indian Ocean to remove dozens of destructive Fish Aggregating Devices. These FADs kill endangered marine life including sharks and turtles, but despite this, leading tuna brands John West and Thai Union continue to use them. Since our campaign launched, Tesco and Waitrose have threatened to remove John West from their shelves unless they clean up their act. 

John West caught red handed in the Indian Ocean - thanks to you!

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 21 April 2016 at 3:59pm - Comments

Greenpeace crew, currently on board the Esperanza in the Indian Ocean, have found a destructive fishing device (FAD) that has been deployed by a John West supplier. We know this thanks to your research on John West tuna cans coming from the region. 

A tale of two tunas

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 15 February 2016 at 3:39pm - Comments
Fish gather under Fish Aggregating Device (FAD)
All rights reserved. Credit: © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
All kinds of marine life gather under so-called "Fish Aggregating Devices" - or "FADs" - and are then scooped up in huge fishing nets

Imagine a world where there are two tuna companies called John West.

Both are the number one brand in their market. Both faced Greenpeace campaigns and, as a consequence, made commitments to sell 100% sustainably-caught tuna by the end of 2016.

Now imagine one John West has kept its promise to consumers. And the other John West has broken it.

This isn’t some fantasy world. It’s very real. And it’s not good news for UK consumers...

Customer outrage over tuna giants John West and Thai Union

Posted by Ariana Densham — 21 October 2015 at 10:56am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Marie Derome
Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall on John West's broken sustainability promise

Tuna has finally gone mainstream, following the outcry in the media that John West* has broken its sustainability and traceability promises. 

We’ve reached millions of people, from This Morning with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Radio 2’s Jeremy Vine show, to The Times front page and countless other newspapers, everyone is outraged by the embarrassing progress John West has made meeting its sustainability promise to customers. 

John West is breaking its promise to consumers and is still trashing the oceans for cheap tuna

Last edited 5 October 2015 at 9:15am
5 October, 2015

Greenpeace’s tuna league table for 2015 sees the UK’s largest tinned tuna brand, John West, sink to the bottom of the ranking, with a woeful 98% of its tuna caught using destructive and unsustainable fishing methods.

After promising consumers back in 2011 that 100% of its tuna would be sustainable by 2016, John West has managed only a dismal 2% – with nearly all of its tuna caught in nets using so-called Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) which indiscriminately kill a host of other marine life, including sharks and even endangered sea turtles.

The winners and losers: tinned tuna league table kicks off new campaign to end destructive fishing

Posted by Ariana Densham — 2 October 2015 at 4:29pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Emily Buchanan
John West are failing to meet their commitment to source sustainable tuna

The new Greenpeace tinned tuna league table exposes the wide gulf between UK supermarkets and brands which have taken sustainability seriously and those which have simply broken promises to clean up. Use this to help you decide which brands to buy and which to avoid until they improve. 

#JustTuna

For the first time, this league table ranks brands on a wider range of issues. Yes, there’s fishing methods of course, but we’ve also rated them on;