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In Pictures: Damning the Amazon

Posted by Angela Glienicke - 13th April 2016


A report published this week by Greenpeace Brazil shines a spotlight on technology giant Siemens’ involvement in a massive hydropower dam planned for the Tapajós River.

The dam would not only flood huge parts of the rainforest, but also threaten the cultural survival of 12,000 Indigenous Munduruku People who have lived along the Tapajos River for centuries. This collection of images illustrates not only what is at stake, but also what could lie ahead for the Tapajos river, by looking at the effects of the Belo Monte dam project on Brazil.

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A type of bird named Hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin) near the Tapajós river, next to Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land. The Brazilian Government plans to build 43 dams in the Tapajós river basin. The largest planned dam, São Luiz do Tapajós, will impact the life of indigenous peoples and riverside communities.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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The Tapajós river, next to Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land, home to the Munduruku people in Brazil.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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A beautiful Titi monkey at home in indigenous land called Sawré Muybu. The land is home to the Mundruku tribe.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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Aerial view of the Tapajós River in Northern Brazil. There are plans for three major dams to be built on this river.

© Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace 2013

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Construction of Belo Monte Dam, on the Xingu river in Altamira, Pará, Brazil.

© Carol Quintanilha / Greenpeace 2014

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Aerial view of the Belo Monte Dam construction site. Belo Monte is a controversial hydropower plant that is being built in the Xingu River, one of the largest rivers in the Amazon basin. For 20 years indigenous groups, rural communities and environmentalists have fought against the construction. Now indigenous communities are having to fight a new dam.

© Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace 2013

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A housing development for workers under construction outside of Santarém, Brazil

© Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace 2013

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Aerial photograph showing rainforest in Pará state, Brazil. The Ipê tree flowers with brilliant pink, yellow or white flowers every September.

© Daniel Beltrá / Greenpeace 2013

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The Tapajós river, next to Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land, home to the Munduruku people in Northern Brazil.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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A child from the Munduruku indigenous tribe in Sawré Muybu, Northern Brazil.

The largest planned dam, São Luiz do Tapajós, will impact the life of indigenous peoples and riverside communities. Mega-dams like these threaten the fragile biome of the Amazon, where rivers are fundamental to regeneration and distribution of plant species and the survival of local plantlife.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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Munduruku in the Tapajós river, next to Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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Achiote (Bixa orellana), fruit known for the red paint it provides, near the Tapajós river, next to Sawré Muybu Indigenous Land.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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Red-and-green macaw (Ara chloropterus) feathers used to make a Munduruku Cacique (chief) cockade.

© Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace 2016

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Greenpeace Brazil activists have joined forces with Munduruku Indigenous leaders to protest the Brazilian government’s plans to build a mega dam complex in the Tapajós River, in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. Together, we believe we can stop the dam – protecting people and planet.

© Fábio Nascimento / Greenpeace 2016


Article Tagged as: Amazon, Featured, in pictures


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