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In Pictures: Still plenty of fish in the West African Sea, Greenpeace investigates on World Fisheries Day

Posted by Angela Glienicke - 21st November 2017


It’s World Fisheries Day today and Greenpeace Africa has published a new report about the threats illegal and overfishing practises pose to the livelihood of millions of Africans. In only twenty days, Greenpeace and fisheries inspectors from Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Sierra Leone and Senegal came across 17 vessels contravening applicable rules, including involvement in illegal transshipment, fishing in breach of their license conditions, using illegal nets and shark finning. The photos from this year show our investigation and reveal the harmful fishing practices and over exploitation taking place in West African waters. All images are by photographer Pierre Gleizes.

Inspectors and Greenpeace campaigners sit on an inflatable boat on their way for a high sea control of Chinese fishing trawler FU HAI YU 1111 by Sierra Leone fishery inspectors. The boat has been arrested and sent to Freetown after illegal fishing gear was discovered on board.
Sierra Leone fishery inspectors undertake a High sea control of Chinese fishing trawler FU HAI YU 1111. The boat has been arrested and sent to Freetown after illegal fishing gear was discovered on board. The Greenpeace ship Esperanza can bee seen in the background.
The catch log book is on scraps of paper. Sierra Leone fishery inspectors undertake a High sea control of Chinese fishing trawler FU HAI YU 2222.
A fisherman works on board the FU YUANG YU 380 Chinese fishing boat.
Fish bycatch is thrown back at sea by fishermen on board the FU YUANG YU 362 Chinese fishing boat.
Undersized fish catch (the Pagellus fish should be minimum 15 cm long) is found on board the Senegalese fishing boat DAK 1115 / 6WGG / KANBAL III.
During a high sea control carried out by Senegalese DPSP fishery inspectors and Greenpeace, the vessel refused for 22 minutes to obey the inspector’s request to stop.
It was later discovered on board that this time had been used to hide away an illegal fishing trick to make the net mesh smaller.
Guinea Bissau fishery officers arrest Chinese fishing vessel Yi Feng 08 for inadequate identification markings.
A fisherman waves while standing on the beach next to a pirogue on Turtle Islands.
Half of the reefers and trawler boats visible in the background are under police arrest for fishing infractions.
Dolphins swimming in Guinean EEZ.
Guinean Fishery Minister Andre Lou visits the Greenpeace ship Esperanza.
Greenpeace is on tour in West African waters to address the problem of overfishing in the region.
Fish heads poke through the net on Senegalese / Chinese fishing boat SOLEIL 12 / DAK 822 / 6WBM, during a high sea control carried out by Senegalese DPSP fishery inspectors and Greenpeace.
The fish processing chain can be seen on board the Senegalese fishing boat AMINE /6WKH / DAK 1203, during a high sea control in a joint operation by DPSP fishery inspectors and Greenpeace in Senegalese EEZ.
A hammerhead shark, caught as bycatch, lies in the fish hold of FU YUANG YU 379 Chinese fishing boat.
The Greenpeace ship Esperanza, inflatable and sunset can be seen in Mauritanian EEZ.
Dolphins swim off Guinea.

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