Greenpeace Blog

Return of the Arctic Sunrise

Posted by faiza_oulahsen — 1 August 2014 at 3:25pm - Comments
Faiza Oulahsen, one of the Arctic 30,  in front of the Arctic Sunrise
All rights reserved. Credit: Denis Sinyakov/Greenpeace

Those last days on the Arctic Sunrise in September 2013, gave me one of my most precious memories. That might sound odd to you: armed men with balaclavas abseiling down from a helicopter and holding some of the crew at gunpoint; unable to communicate with the outside world, our movements limited to a few rooms of the ship; unaware of the emotional rollercoaster that was lying ahead of us.

Crackdown and arrests of activists: a first-hand account

Posted by Vivek Goyal — 30 July 2014 at 3:59pm - Comments
Peaceful protest in India
All rights reserved. Credit: Udit kulshrestha/Greenpeace
Peaceful protest in India

Last month, Emma Gibson wrote about her visit to the forest in Mahan, India. Villagers and Greenpeace staff have been facing threats and intimidation there because of their attempts to stop the forest being cut down in pursuit of the coal that lies underneath.

Things are really hotting up now, with fresh arrests and intimidation occurring in the lead up to a village meeting and vote called the Gram Sabha. At the Gram Sabha villagers will be asked to vote to on giving up their historic rights to live and work in the forest in order to make way for a coal mine.

Why 50 children and their families are playing outside Shell's HQ

Posted by Fran G — 29 July 2014 at 9:41am - Comments
Children with a LEGO blocks spelling Arctic
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
These kids are really concerned about climate change

Today, 50 children are playfully protesting about LEGO's partnership with Shell outside the oil giant's HQ in London by building their favourite Arctic animals out of oversized LEGO bricks. It’s an unusual but hopefully creative and exciting way of facilitating peaceful protest, which might need a little extra explanation.

Why my children are taking part in a playful protest against LEGO's partnership with Shell

Posted by Jessica Edberg — 29 July 2014 at 8:48am - Comments
Children building LEGO Arctic animals outside Shell HQ
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Playtime outside Shell's HQ

Jessica Edberg is a mother of two. Her daughter, Lily, aged 7, is taking part in a playful protest today against LEGO's partnership with Shell. 50 kids in total are protesting today by building three giant LEGO Arctic animals outside of Shell's HQ in London. With their parents and guardians, they're calling on LEGO to stop promoting Shell's logo on LEGO toys because kids love the Arctic and don't want Shell to destroy it.

Is Britain up for shale?

Posted by Graham Thompson — 28 July 2014 at 5:49pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Osborne's new solution to the housing bubble.

In twenty years’ time, when Britain is transformed into a green and pleasant Texas with oil and gas fracking wells on every corner, you may find yourself asking ‘when exactly did we agree to let this happen?’ Well, the answer is today. The 28th of July, 2014 saw our government announce the fourteenth licensing round and put Britain up for shale. Is this something you need to worry about? We think so.

How has LEGO responded?

Posted by sara_a — 28 July 2014 at 11:59am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace East Asia
Giant LEGO figures with their hands over their ears at the Hong Kong comic fair

It’s nearly a month into the campaign to ask much loved toy-maker LEGO to ditch their arctic-drilling partner Shell. Over 670,000 around the world have joined the campaign so far and LEGO have been the target of Greenpeace actions at their HQs, factory, and in public on several continents, heaping the pressure on them to respond. But since then they have just made one public response on their website, and then used the same text in every media quote and Facebook response. So we’ve looked at their response in detail and have answered it in full here.

The evidence flying over their heads

Posted by victoriah — 28 July 2014 at 11:18am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Nick Cobbing / Greenpeace

Out in the water in the Arctic, the evidence of commercial fishing's impact is staring me in the face, with beady eyes.

Guillemot Central

Posted by Richard Page — 28 July 2014 at 11:18am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Nick Cobbing / Greenpeace

For a birder there are few sights more exciting than a large cliff-side colony of breeding seabirds with all the noise and activity, the endless comings and goings. It would be impossible not to be impressed by the cliffs at Alkefjellet in Svalbard. The glacier ice is red in places a result of an algae living within the ice. Stretching from the entrance of a fjord and butting up to a glacier, this area is truly a living land and seascape.

In pictures: Seeing light after 33 years of darkness, first fully solar-powered village in India

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 24 July 2014 at 4:03pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Vivek M / Greenpeace
A solar powered street lamp seen at the Bishunpur Tolla, Dharnai village.

We just take it for granted: cleaning our teeth with an electric toothbrush in the morning, unlimited texting, tweeting and snap-chatting with our friends on the way to work, safe and well-lit streets, superfast internet access from our desk, the list goes on.<--break->

But for 300 million people in India this is not a given as they are still waiting for electricity.

David Rose is not a credible source - OFFICIAL

Posted by Graham Thompson — 24 July 2014 at 12:46pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: David Rose/Mail on Sunday
The source of denial (joke copywrited to Graham Thompson)

This may not be entirely new or surprising information to you, but the English speaking press around the world has been recycling Rose's Mail on Sunday climate denial nonsense for nearly a decade. Now a decision of the Australian Press Council, published today, means that 'it was in the Mail' is no longer an excuse for publishing climate misinformation.

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