Blog: Oceans

Tell the Big Bad Wolf to change their tune over tuna. Again!

Posted by Ariana Densham — 28 February 2014 at 5:56pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Dodgy tuna

Once upon a time, well actually, three years ago, Tesco promised to help protect our oceans. Just like a knight in shining armour arriving to save the day, they suddenly switched and made the boldest public promise of all the tuna brands to clean up their tins just before we launched a tuna league table in which they were last.

Top ten reasons to LOVE the ocean

Posted by Willie — 14 February 2014 at 10:02am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

It’s Valentine’s Day. To offer you a sugar-free, non-commercialised way of celebrating here are our top ten reasons to LOVE the ocean.

Repeat offender – the Russian factory trawler seized by Senegal

Posted by Willie — 14 January 2014 at 3:08pm - Comments
Greenpace takes action aginst Russian trawler fishing illegally in West Africa
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Greenpeace encounters the Oleg Naydenov fishing illegally in 2012

Have you heard the one about Greenpeace controlling the French Navy? No, me neither. But you might be forgiven for being confused by some recent reports about the Russian trawler seized in West Africa.

Pirate fishing is a big problem. Sometimes it’s fishing over quota (catching more than you should, or species that you shouldn’t), sometimes it’s fishing in ways or places you shouldn’t. Overfishing may seem like a victimless crime – but it isn’t, and the ultimate effect is bad news for our oceans, the creatures that live in them, and the humans whose livelihoods or future food source depends on them.

Arrest of the Oleg Naydenov shows flag states need to better control their fleets

Posted by Daniel — 9 January 2014 at 2:00pm - Comments

In the summer of 2012, small-scale Senegalese fishermen reported a rapid and significant increase in their catches. They attributed their rising fortunes to newly elected President Macky Sall's decision to revoke the licences of 29 large foreign trawlers, which together were taking as much as half of the country's catch of pelagic fish. The licences had been granted under dubious circumstances by the previous fisheries minister, as exposed in this report by Greenpeace Africa.

Oops: University of Aberdeen used to justify Iceland's whaling programme.

Posted by Willie — 3 December 2013 at 11:35am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
University of Aberdeen research is being used to justify Iceland's whaling programme.

Science doesn’t always get a lot of breaks, it’s constantly twisted and misrepresented in the media, and sometimes the best intentions end up being used in ways the scientists themselves would never want them to be or condone. Who’d have thought, for example, that UK universities could be used to defend commercial whaling? Yet, that's exactlly what's happening right now.

UK government progress on marine conservation isn’t making many waves

Posted by Willie — 21 November 2013 at 2:11pm - Comments
Marine Reserves
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

The government has at long last made an announcement on the first wave of marine conservation zones (MCZs) in UK waters. This is long overdue, but frankly fails to deliver. Today’s announcement to designate only 27 sites is a whopping 100 sites short of what the government’s own consultation said was necessary. So what’s going on?

How the lobbying bill became the charity gagging bill

Posted by John Sauven — 3 September 2013 at 1:37pm - Comments
A man with his mouth gagged
All rights reserved. Credit: Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert / Greenpeace
Charities and campaigning groups have lined up to condemn the 'charity gagging bill'

When David Cameron described the access of business lobbyists to government as "the next big scandal", we thought he was making a prediction.

But his lobbying bill, otherwise known as the 'charity gagging bill', seems so deliberately controversial, and is being rushed through parliament with such unseemly haste, that we're wondering if he was actually making a promise.

Shark finning sucks. Sort it out New Zealand!

Posted by Willie — 27 August 2013 at 10:07am - Comments
Shark fin soup drives the global shark finning trade.
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Shark finning: not big, not clever, not defensible

There’s nothing defensible about shark finning. It’s the marine equivalent of the poachers who kill rhinos to hack off their horns or kill elephants to hack off their tusks. It’s not dissimilar to killing bears or tigers for spurious ‘traditional’ cures either. But it happens out at sea, to animals which don’t have big brown eyes, and which aren’t usually touted as cuddly toys or ‘adoptable’. They rarely win public polls on favourite animals, yet they fill column inches every silly scaremongering summer season in the tabloids.

Tackling overfishing from the Pacific to the Atlantic

Posted by Nina Schrank — 13 August 2013 at 11:34am - Comments
Senegalese fishermen in a traditional 'Pirogue' boat
All rights reserved. Credit: Clement Tardif
Fishermen in Senegal in a traditional pirogue boat

You may have been lucky enough to see the superb National Geographic programme Mission To Save The Ocean last Saturday. If not, don’t worry, I’ll give you the rundown here.

The programme went across the globe to West Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, following Greenpeace campaigners tackling the root causes of overfishing.

Is the tide turning in favour of sharks?

Posted by Willie — 9 August 2013 at 2:25pm - Comments
Sharks often hit the news for the wrong reason, here's some better news.
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Down with scare stories - how about some positive shark news for a change?

At the end of Shark Week, it’s time for some good news on sharks. Despite all the earlier blogs this week, this is not me trying to convince you sharks are huggable and loveable (though, they are, obviously), rather a round-up of some good conservation news for the world’s often-underappreciated shark species.

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