Blog: Oceans

Is the tide turning in favour of sharks?

Posted by Willie — 9 August 2013 at 3:25pm - Comments
Sharks often hit the news for the wrong reason, here's some better news.
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Down with scare stories - how about some positive shark news for a change?

At the end of Shark Week, it’s time for some good news on sharks. Despite all the earlier blogs this week, this is not me trying to convince you sharks are huggable and loveable (though, they are, obviously), rather a round-up of some good conservation news for the world’s often-underappreciated shark species.

Never-ending teeth, ninjas, and cannibalistic nurseries – 10 amazing facts for Shark Week

Posted by Willie — 8 August 2013 at 4:02pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton / Greenpeace

Sharks have a never-ending supply of teeth. They regenerate replacement dentition on an inexhaustible toothy conveyor belt ... which explains why you see so few shark dentists.

But sharks are not all about teeth, despite the bad press. Filter feeders like the megamouth shark, are mostly big (but harmless) mouths; the winghead shark has a head half the length of its body, and; the thresher sharks have a huge tai (ideal for stunning fish before eating them) that can be the same length as its body.

Shark Week: naming and shaming the world’s most ridiculous sharks

Posted by Willie — 7 August 2013 at 2:07pm - Comments
Less scary, more ridiculous - some names we give sharks seem pretty unflattering
All rights reserved. Credit: Willie Mackenzie
Sharks don't half get called some silly names

Lots of people are frightened of sharks. That makes some sense if you think all sharks are relentless man-eating teeth-machines, but in reality the vast majority of them are much more scared of us, or they should be. There are over 350 species of sharks around the world, but they don’t all get to grab the headlines or star in feature film franchises. So in honour of Shark Week, and to show you how daft it is to be irrationally fearful of some of these critters, here’s a quick guide to the silliest-named sharks in our oceans.

In pictures: swimming with sharks

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 6 August 2013 at 11:52am - Comments
Whale Shark
All rights reserved. Credit: Hilton/Greenpeace
Whale sharks in Cenderawasih Bay

It’s Shark Week! This collection of photos from our archive supports Discovery Channel’s celebration of these amazing species and the television programme’s aim to raise awareness and respect for sharks.

The essential Greenpeace guide to surviving a shark attack

Posted by Willie — 6 August 2013 at 10:36am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Willie Mackenzie
Giving a hungry shark something else to chew on might be a good tactic.

It’s Shark Week. Despite us trying to tell you otherwise, some of you still worry about getting chomped by a shark. So, to allay your fears and help give you some practical ways to avoid being shark sushi, here is the handy Greenpeace guide to avoiding shark attacks.

Shaping up for a fin-filled Shark Week

Posted by Willie — 5 August 2013 at 9:30am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
Every week is Shark Week for the oceans campaign.

It’s Shark Week. You’re allowed to be excited. If you already like sharks you will doubtless be enjoying that the internet is awash with sharp-finned fun. But if you don’t know much about sharks, or are a bit wary because they’re scary, you might be wondering what all the fuss is about.

Sharks need parks (and for you to stop rubbing them on your face)

Posted by Willie — 29 July 2013 at 4:34pm - Comments
Selfridges Project Ocean save our sharks display
All rights reserved. Credit: Willie Mackenzie
Selfridges Project Ocean - making sharks more fluffy

Okay, so it’s unlikely you’ll ever see a hammerhead on a helter-skelter; it’s fair to say you won’t see many basking sharks see-sawing with sawfish; and woe betide the wobbegong that tries to have a go on a roundabout. But sharks need parks too. They have as much right to play in safety as anyone else, right?

Blackfish: when whales turn killer

Posted by Willie — 24 July 2013 at 4:24pm - Comments
An orca performing
All rights reserved. Credit: Dogwoof
Being held in captivity can chop 50-60 years from a killer whale's life expectancy

When I was little, I can vaguely remember a trip to Blair Drummond Safari Park for my birthday. This was back in the days when the world was black and white, Starburst was called Opal Fruits, and they still had dolphins in captivity in the UK. I don’t remember much, but I know we watched a dolphin ‘show’ with balls and hoops and clapping and ‘ooh-ing’.

You can’t see a dolphin in the UK doing that today. That is progress.

'No one owns the fish of the sea': landmark ruling prevents ocean privatisation

Posted by Ariana Densham — 10 July 2013 at 10:32am - Comments
Sustainably caught fish in Hastings
All rights reserved. Credit: David Sandison / Greenpeace
The High Court ruling prevents big business from claiming ownership of fish stocks

This morning I was at the High Court in central London where a historic ruling was handed down on who controls the UK's right to fish.

An attempt by big fishing firms to protect their decades-long stranglehold on Britain’s fish was resoundingly defeated in court. The judgement gives back control of our seas to the public and the UK government, rather than big industry.

Exposed: Iceland's whale hunt (graphic images)

Posted by jamess — 19 June 2013 at 5:35pm - Comments
Fin whale caught by an Icelandic whaling ship
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Iceland is once again undermining the global ban on commercial whaling

Sorry these pictures are grim, but it's important we get the message out.

This morning, one of our undercover photographers sent pictures showing a magnificent fin whale being harpooned and diced up by an Icelandic ship.

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