Old King Coal, Your Days Are Numbered

Posted by Anonymous — 18 November 2015 at 2:43pm - Comments
by-nc-sa. Credit: Steve Morgan / Greenpeace
The government has announced that coal power stations, like Drax pictured here, will close by 2025

There is news worth celebrating coming from the Department of Energy and Climate Change today.

The UK has just become the first G20 economy to stamp a clear expiry date on coal, one of the main drivers of climate change. Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Amber Rudd has pledged to phase coal out of our energy mix entirely by 2025.

Why is the ‘party of business’ doing everything they can to damage the main growth industries of the 21st century?

Posted by Graham Thompson — 22 July 2015 at 2:02pm - Comments
Conservative manifesto cover
You really do need to speak to your father-in-law, George.

Coal and nuclear are dying, and the future of energy lies in solar. This isn’t a Guardian reader’s fantasy, this is the established trend in energy markets. This isn’t a declaration of victory over carbon dioxide either – the trend isn’t fast enough to stop catastrophic climate change, at least not yet – but it’s useful information for policy makers. Unless you’re George Osborne, in which case it’s time to plough the nation’s remaining finances into life support for nuclear and coal whilst standing athwart history yelling ‘STOP!’ 

Standard Chartered feels the heat over threat to Great Barrier Reef

Posted by Anonymous — 7 May 2015 at 3:56pm - Comments
Hong Kong Greenpeace activists unfurl a huge stair-riser banner outside the HQ
by. Credit: Clement Tang/Greenpeace
Hong Kong: Greenpeace activists unfurl a stair-riser banner in front of the Standard Chartered’s headquarters

As a contracted advisor to the planned Carmichael mega-mine, UK-based international bank Standard Chartered must be feeling rather exposed at the moment following a Hong Kong protest and then questions from Greenpeace at its annual general meeting in London.

Priya Pillai speaks to UK MPs despite being barred from travelling to the UK

Posted by petespeller — 15 January 2015 at 3:47pm - Comments
Priya Pillai speaks to members of the UK APPG on Indo-British relations via Skyp
All rights reserved. Credit: John Cobb / Greenpeace

Undeterred by the government of India trying to halt her speech when she was barred from boarding her flight to London, Greenpeace India campaigner Priya Pillai stuck to her commitment of taking the voices of struggle from Mahan to a global stage and addressed a gathering of MPs at the Parliament in London on Wednesday.

Supreme court order kills Essar’s plans

Posted by aksheykalra — 25 September 2014 at 12:59pm - Comments
Women peacefully protesting in Mahan
All rights reserved. Credit: Vinit Gupta / Greenpeace
Peaceful Forest Protest in India

If you haven't heard so far, the Supreme Court of India cancelled 214 coal blocks allocated to private companies since 1993, deeming them illegal. And one of these coal blocks brings us to the story of Mahan, one of the oldest Sal forests in Asia and livelihood to more than 50,000 people.

View from the coal face

Posted by Fran G — 23 September 2014 at 2:18pm - Comments
Greenpeace activist on top of a coal train with power station in the background
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Activist on the coal train

I can see the giant towers of the Cottam coal power plant looming on the horizon from my perch on top of a heap of coal, in the carriage of a coal supply train.

People vs coal

Posted by Lawrence Carter — 23 September 2014 at 1:39pm - Comments
Activist with a bag of coal from the train, with address label to Vladimir Putin
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Coal ready to be returned to sender

BREAKING: More than 50 people have stopped a train carrying coal to Cottam power station and are now unloading its climate-wrecking cargo. The train, transporting around 1,500 tonnes of coal to be burned in the power station’s furnaces, was flagged down safely this afternoon as it approached the power station.

The Mahan Story — It Takes a Village

Posted by Anonymous — 26 August 2014 at 4:07pm - Comments
Local people from Mahan, India, protest against a proposed coal mine.
All rights reserved. Credit: Vinit Gupta/Greenpeace
Local people in Mahan, central India, come together to oppose mining in their forests.

In the village it is pitch dark by 7.30 pm. At the designated spot for the meeting, there are about 15 or 20 villagers holding solar lanterns. The meeting lasts over two hours and throughout that time, people keep coming and joining the conversation. Halfway into the meeting, I turn around to steal a quick look at the crowd and I am surprised at how large the group has become! It’s about a 100 people sitting, standing, leaning against their houses and trees, listening intently and waiting for their turn to speak.

Crackdown and arrests of activists: a first-hand account

Posted by Vivek Goyal — 30 July 2014 at 2:59pm - Comments
Peaceful protest in India
All rights reserved. Credit: Udit kulshrestha/Greenpeace
Peaceful protest in India

Last month, Emma Gibson wrote about her visit to the forest in Mahan, India. Villagers and Greenpeace staff have been facing threats and intimidation there because of their attempts to stop the forest being cut down in pursuit of the coal that lies underneath.

Things are really hotting up now, with fresh arrests and intimidation occurring in the lead up to a village meeting and vote called the Gram Sabha. At the Gram Sabha villagers will be asked to vote to on giving up their historic rights to live and work in the forest in order to make way for a coal mine.

Greenpeace India's 'big fight' over coal

Posted by emmagibson — 10 June 2014 at 4:32pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Vinit
Priya Pillai and 400 fellow villagers demand release of Bechanlal

They call this part of northern India the Badlands because it's renowned for its lawlessness. It certainly feels like the wild west and instead of the gold rush, it's a coal rush with companies like British-listed Essar making this area feel like a new frontier. 

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