ocean plastics

2.5 tonne ocean plastic sculpture installed on doorstep of Coca-Cola HQ

Last edited 10 April 2017 at 10:27am

Monday 10th April, 2017. London - This morning Greenpeace activists have installed a 2.5 tonne ocean plastic sculpture on the doorstep of Coca-Cola’s London HQ, in protest at the company’s role in ocean plastic pollution.

The artwork, Plasticide, was created by renowned underwater sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor and features seabirds regurgitating plastic amidst a family beach picnic. Up to 12.7 million tonnes of plastic enters the sea every year, and plastic bottles and bottle tops form a major source of the plastic packaging found washed up on the world’s shorelines. But major companies like Coca-Cola are failing to take meaningful action.

Onboard the Beluga II

Posted by Marcela Teran — 19 May 2017 at 12:00pm - Comments
A picture of Marcela, member of GPUK oceans team, onboard the Beluga II boat
All rights reserved. Credit: Kajsa Sjölander / Greenpeace
Marcela onboard the Beluga II

Last week I had the privilege to sail along the east coast of Scotland on board Greenpeace’s ship the Beluga II. This is the start of a two-month expedition documenting and investigating the impact of plastic in some of the most stunning and biodiverse areas of the UK.

UK Government plans to outlaw microbeads! But a limited ban won't do.

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 7 September 2016 at 9:43am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

This weekend, the Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom announced a plan to ban microbeads from cosmetic products like face scrubs, toothpastes and shower gels. This is brilliant news for the 350,000 people who have signed our petition in collaboration with Fauna & Flora International, the Marine Conservation Society and the Environmental Investigation Agency. It shows the government is taking steps to protect our oceans from this pointless plastic pollution. BUT… (oh why is there always a ‘but’?!)

Greenpeace report identifies growing risk of plastic in seafood

Last edited 25 August 2016 at 10:07am
25 August, 2016

Just a day after a cross-party group of MPs called on the Government to ban microbeads, a new Greenpeace report lays out the science on the impact of microplastics, including microbeads, on our oceans and our seafood.

The report, which collates the latest academic research, identifies the risks of these tiny plastics spreading toxic chemicals, being eaten by marine life and even travelling up the food chain to the seafood on our plates.  

Plastics in Seafood

Last edited 25 August 2016 at 7:56am

This report lays out the science on the impact of microplastics, including microbeads, on our oceans and our seafood.

Plastics in Seafood, which collates the latest academic research, identifies the risks of these tiny plastics spreading toxic chemicals, being eaten by marine life and even travelling up the food chain to the seafood on our plates.

Environment Committee calls for ban on microbeads - joint response from environmental organisations

Last edited 24 August 2016 at 7:21am
24 August, 2016

Responding to the Environmental Audit Committee’s report on microplastics, a joint statement by the Environmental Investigation Agency, Fauna & Flora International, Greenpeace UK, and the Marine Conservation Society, said:

An estimated eight million tonnes of plastic goes into our seas every year – and microbeads in household products including face scrubs, toothpastes and detergents are a part of this problem.

There was already huge public support for a ban on microbeads – with over 300,000 people backing our campaign – and now there’s political support which crosses party boundaries.

Microbead ranking: industry disarray shows need for political ban, says Greenpeace

Last edited 25 July 2016 at 3:49pm
20 July, 2016

A new Greenpeace report has ranked the world’s 30 biggest cosmetics and personal care companies on their commitment to tackling the issue of microbeads in their products.

The report, compiled by Greenpeace East Asia, paints a picture of an industry in disarray: with some companies virtually ignoring the issue and others suggesting limited action.

310,000 people call for microbead ban in cosmetic products on World Oceans Day

Last edited 21 June 2016 at 1:45pm
8 June, 2016

London, 8 June 2016 - A coalition of environmental groups marked World Oceans Day by presenting David Cameron with a petition signed by more than 300,000 people calling for the Prime Minister to ban the toxic microplastic particles known as microbeads.

Found in products such as facial scrubs and toothpaste, millions of the tiny plastics are flushed unwittingly into the world’s oceans every year where they ultimately end up in the marine food chain.

A report published last week found that fish can become smaller and slower due to the effects of eating microplastics.

The long list of names were presented at Number 10 by representatives of Greenpeace UK, the Environmental investigation Agency (EIA), Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and the Marine Conservation Society (MCS).

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