Oceans

Deposit Return Schemes - what exactly are they?

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 22 February 2017 at 4:50pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Will Rose / Greenpeace

You may have seen the term Deposit Return Scheme batted around lately- but what exactly does it mean?

The way I like to think of it is this - with a DRS, you buy the contents of a bottle (glug glug, delicious smoothie), but only borrow the bottle. The tiny deposit paid on top of the drink is fully refundable once the empty bottle is returned. This bottle can then be recycled or (even better!) reused.

Microbeads consultation: the good, the bad, & the ???

Posted by Elisabeth Whitebread — 20 December 2016 at 12:17pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Fred Dott/ Greenpeace

Back in September, the government announced it was planning to launch a consultation on banning microbeads, those pesky toxic beads that companies have added to face washes, toothpastes, washing powders and other products.

A rubbish truck of plastic in the ocean every minute  -  and how you can help

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 17 November 2016 at 11:09am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace/Will Rose

With the ebb and flow of the tides, thousands of miles of coastline around the UK testify to the devastation that plastic pollution is having on the marine environment. The oceans are at their choking point, for every mile of beach surveyed there are 159 plastic bottles found washed up.

A deposit return scheme for Scotland?

Posted by alice.hunter — 11 November 2016 at 5:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: mark ferguson / Alamy Stock Photo
Plastic pollution on a beach in Orkney

A truckload of plastic waste enters our oceans every minute.

When I first heard this statistic I couldn’t believe it. But the evidence is all around us - from tiny microbeads in our toothpaste to images of seabirds with stomachs full of plastic. Plastic pollution is out of control.

What happened at the International Whaling Commission 2016 meeting

Posted by Willie — 28 October 2016 at 3:48pm - Comments
Image of a whale's fluke (tail)
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

The International Whaling Commission meeting 2016 has just come to a close. Delegates from 64 countries spent a week discussing and debating whales, in Potoroz, Slovenia.
Greenpeace’s international team was there, and here’s a quick roundup of what happened.

VICTORY! Massive new Ocean Sanctuary established off Antarctica!

Posted by Willie — 27 October 2016 at 9:03pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

Today, the largest marine protected area in the world was created in the Ross Sea, off the coast of Antarctica. This is a HUGE victory for the whales, penguins, and toothfish that live there and for the millions of people standing up to protect our oceans.

Vaquita porpoise takes centre stage at Whaling Commission meeting.

Posted by Willie — 27 October 2016 at 3:25pm - Comments
Image of vaquita porpoise
All rights reserved. Credit: Tom Jefferson

Big news for a little porpoise.

Something big just happened for the tiny vaquita porpoise at the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting. The diminutive porpoise was the subject of a resolution, passed by all the countries present, urging concerted international cooperation to save the species from extinction.

Whale Fail – no new sanctuary in the South Atlantic (again).

Posted by Willie — 25 October 2016 at 9:51am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Twitter

Bad news from the 2016 International Whaling Commission meeting – as the first significant vote was another disappointment for whales and supporters of conservation. Despite getting a majority of votes in favour, the proposal to create a South Atlantic Whale Sanctuary did not pass, because it was short of the three-quarters majority needed.

10 good reasons to protect whales

Posted by Willie — 21 October 2016 at 12:42pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Kate Davison

Killing whales for food has been happening for millennia. But it was commercial whaling – turning whales into barrels of oil for profit – that led to the wholesale destruction of most of the world’s populations of big whales.

Why is everyone talking about whale poo?

Posted by Willie — 20 October 2016 at 3:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Paul Hilton

Whales are special. No, not for any stereotypical hippy la-la reasons, this is *science*!

Healthy oceans need lots of healthy whale populations: they keep things in balance, help disperse and mix nutrients, support entire ecosystems and help fight climate change.

Surprised? Read on…

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