Oceans

A big step forward for our oceans

Posted by Fran G — 28 June 2012 at 2:07pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Image courtesy of Tourism Queensland

For a long time organisations like Greenpeace, backed by people like you, have been calling for stronger protection of our oceans.

Last week showed our voices were heard. The Australian environment minister Tony Burke announced what is a genuinely significant step forward for ocean protection, not only for Australia, but in global terms. 

Guest blog: Juliet Eilperin travels through the hidden world of sharks

Posted by hayley.baker — 21 June 2012 at 4:42pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Juliet Eilperin
Juliet Eilperin, pictured in Belize is national environmental reporter for the Washington Post

As summer begins, sharks are on many people’s minds. People are thinking about them, however, in radically different ways.

Many beachgoers view sharks with trepidation, especially after 30-year old Ian Redmond was killed in a shark strike last year while honeymooning in the Seychelles. But for many of the world’s leaders, this may be the time when they’re preparing to rethink the shark.

A good deal for our oceans, or does something smell fishy in Luxembourg?

Posted by Willie — 20 June 2012 at 11:30am - Comments
Cornwall Greenpeace group went to the Falmouth Sea Shanty Festival to campaign a
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Last weekend Cornwall Greenpeace group took our new campaign to the Falmouth Sea Shanty Festival

EU Council meetings – the epitome of fun. These are when representatives of each EU member state, usually the relevant government minister, get together to discuss issues of importance.  Last Monday - all day, and into the small hours, it was the turn of  the UK’s minister, Richard Benyon to get together with his 26 counterparts to discuss and agree a way forward on Common Fisheries Policy reform.

Make sure the fisheries minister delivers a fair deal on fish law reform

Posted by Willie — 11 June 2012 at 1:38pm - Comments
Plymouth world oceans day
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Be a fisherman's friend launch event at the National Marine Aquarium in Plymouth

Last Friday was World Oceans Day. Being an oceans campaigner that, on one hand, means a lot – but on the other it begs the question of why the rest of the world doesn’t think about oceans all the other days, like I do!?

Guest blogger Callum Roberts: Future oceans

Posted by hayley.baker — 8 June 2012 at 3:08pm - Comments
Callum Roberts
All rights reserved. Credit: Callum Roberts
Callum Roberts is Professor of Marine Conservation at the University of York and is author of Ocean of Life: How our Seas are Changing

Imagine a world, not very far in the future, where families shun the idea of a seaside holiday because the sea is too unpleasant to visit, perhaps even dangerous. The beach is heaped with rotting green seaweed and bodies of jellyfish litter the strand. Getting in the water you risk illness; even the air might be poisonous. If this sounds unlikely, think again: it is all happening somewhere, right now.

What shall we do with broken sea laws? What shall we do with the broken sea laws?

Posted by hayley.baker — 29 May 2012 at 10:27am - Comments
Port Isaac Fisherman's Friend performing our sea shanty petition
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
The Port Isaac's Fisherman's Friends perform the sea shanty

What shall we do with the broken sea laws?  Early in the morning”.  Can you see what we’ve done there? 

Help us get a fair catch for sustainable fishermen

Posted by Alicia C — 29 May 2012 at 8:53am - Comments
Ben and John Griffin, Hastings Fishermen
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
John and Ben Griffin, fishermen from Hastings are part of the campaign

Today we’re launching “Be a fisherman’s friend” campaign  - an unprecedented alliance between Greenpeace and UK sustainable fishermen, to push for a real reform of broken EU fishing laws. 

We need fewer boats and more fish to save our oceans

Posted by jamie — 25 May 2012 at 5:34pm - Comments
Numbers of bluefin tuna are rapidly dwindling

I’m here in Bangkok at a gathering of hundreds of tuna business officials, policy-makers and even a few environmental advocates like myself. It’s been a long week of discussion about the future of the industry, including a lot about what we all call sustainability fish for the future.

Fish tales from the high seas of Senegal

Posted by hayley.baker — 2 May 2012 at 11:23am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Val Kharchenko (Greenpeace) Ze Fortes (footballer) and Gabrielle Manrique (documentary maker)

Our guest blogger, Gabriel Manrique, is an independent documentary filmmaker who focuses on social and environmental issues and the co-director of  ‘Sandgrains’.  He joined the crew of the Arctic Sunrise last month.

Gladys, our Greenpeace liaison in Senegal, had skillfully navigated us through Dakar customs, and we were on the tarmac to board a helicopter which would take us to the Arctic Sunrise. I had flown by chopper only once before and was keenly looking forward to filming from one, but had no idea how much fun it would be.

The ocean is not a factory

Posted by Alicia C — 5 April 2012 at 9:58am - Comments

It seems the captain of Britain’s largest fishing boat isn’t partial to a spot of tea, despite a kind invitation from John Vidal, Environment Editor of the Guardian, as he radioed the vessel from our ship the Arctic Sunrise, off the coast of Mauritania. (See for yourself in John’s video, above.)

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