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Yet more proof that Asia Pulp and Paper's green claims don’t stack up

Posted by jamie — 16 February 2012 at 3:04pm - Comments
Deforestation in Sumatra, Indonesia by Sinar Mas supplier PT Arara Abadi
All rights reserved. Credit: Ulet Infansasti/Greenpeace
Deforestation in Sumatra, Indonesia by Sinar Mas supplier PT Arara Abadi

Another blow has been delivered to the credibility of Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), thanks to some excellent work by WWF. In a survey of the certification bodies that APP regularly references to prop up its flimsy claims of sustainability, none of them would support APP's assertions about its environmental performance.

APP rehomes a tiger after cutting down its forest home

Posted by jamie — 2 August 2011 at 11:26am - Comments
Cleared forest in Sumatra, which was once tiger habitat
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace
Cleared forest in Sumatra, in what was once tiger habitat

The news from Indonesia today that Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) has moved a tiger from one part of South Sumatra province to another in order to protect it. This is supposed to prove that company has green stripes. But, as with anything emanating from the APP publicity machine, scratch beneath the surface and you'll find an altogether different tale.

Why is the world's largest forest certification scheme still standing by APP?

Posted by andy.t — 29 July 2011 at 3:29pm - Comments
A dead Sumatran tiger, found trapped on an APP concession, is carried away by fo
All rights reserved. Credit: Melvinas Priananda/Greenpeace
The dead tiger, found trapped on an APP concession earlier this month, is carried away

Earlier this week, we released some sad, shocking footage showing the slow and gruesome death of a Sumatran tiger that became trapped within an Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) concession in Sumatra's Riau province. The video footage also revealed that in the same APP area, recent forest clearance had taken place in an area identified as tiger habitat.

UK government makes 'clear-cut' decision on timber

Posted by admin — 29 November 2005 at 9:00am - Comments

In July 2000 the UK government introduced a policy requiring all of its departments and agencies to 'actively seek' to buy timber from legal and sustainable sources. Given that central government procurement accounts for approximately 15 per cent of timber used in the UK (and that the broader public sector may account for as much as 40 per cent), this was seen as a positive move to push the wider UK timber market towards environmentally and socially responsible sources.

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