thai union

Why I ran to Thai Union, why I stand for tuna and the ocean

Posted by Rattanasiri Kit... — 2 June 2017 at 10:14am - Comments
Greenpeace activists in tuna costumes run in Central Bangkok
All rights reserved. Credit: © Wason Wanichakorn / Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists in tuna costumes run in Central Bangkok

It was a hot and humid morning in Bangkok but that didn’t stop me from running almost 4 kms in a tuna costume with 20 fellow activists to Thai Union’s headquarters in Bangkok. Was I crazy? Was I hallucinating? No. Over 680,000 consumers from over 130 countries and territories around the world had a message to deliver to Thai Union, urging the company to step forward as a leader on sourcing more sustainable and socially responsible canned tuna, and I was proud to be part of it.

Passing the torch from consumers to Thai Union

Greenpeace ship arrives in central London – calls out Sainsbury’s for “killing our oceans”

Last edited 19 November 2016 at 11:55am
19 November, 2016

Greenpeace’s largest ship, the ice class Esperanza, has arrived at Tower Bridge in central London calling on the supermarket Sainsbury’s to “stop killing our oceans” and drop the unsustainable tuna brand John West.

See here for images of the Esperanza at Tower Bridge

The Esperanza has recently returned from the Indian Ocean where it was exposing the destructive fishing practices of John West and its owner Thai Union, which harm all kinds of marine life including sharks and even turtles in the pursuit of tuna.

John West is ‘paying the price’ for breaking its sustainability promise to consumers

Last edited 25 July 2016 at 3:50pm
25 July, 2016

Responding to Tesco’s announcement that within the week many John West tuna products will be off its shelves, Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner Ariana Densham said:

‘John West broke their sustainability promise to consumers and now they’re paying the price. We know that this move by Tesco is going to cost John West millions. How long will it take for them and their owner Thai Union to work out that stripping our oceans of life is a dead-end business strategy?’

Sainsbury’s tell us to “Taste The Difference” - now people are telling them to #StopTheIndifference

Posted by Fiona Nicholls — 15 July 2016 at 4:33pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace

If you've visited Sainsbury’s during the last week, you may have noticed something a little different in the tuna aisle…<--break-> <--break->

Taking Action on Tuna

Posted by Hélène Bourges — 27 June 2016 at 3:04pm - Comments

Right now, only two per cent of John West tuna is sustainably caught. The rest is sourced from suppliers who use indiscriminate 'fish aggregation devices' (FADs), which see turtles and sharks killed as bycatch. What's happening out at sea – and being sold in our shops – is having a devastating toll on the marine environment. This is why all of us are so determined to transform the tuna industry.


Blockade of Petit Navire Factory in France
Greenpeace Activists confront supply vessel Explorer II
Greenpeace Activists confront supply vessel Explorer II

Behind The Lens

Posted by MeenaRajput — 31 May 2016 at 2:44pm - Comments

Photographer, Will Rose, joined Greenpeace activists on an expedition to the Indian Ocean to remove dozens of destructive Fish Aggregating Devices. These FADs kill endangered marine life including sharks and turtles, but despite this, leading tuna brands John West and Thai Union continue to use them. Since our campaign launched, Tesco and Waitrose have threatened to remove John West from their shelves unless they clean up their act. 

The dodgy case of the Explorer II

Last edited 26 May 2016 at 12:12pm
While in the Indian Ocean tackling Thai Union's destructive fishing practices, the Greenpeace ship the Esperanza came across a vessel employing the unusual technique of beaming high-powered lights into the water to attract fish at night. The Explorer II is owned by the Spanish company Albacora Group - a supplier to Thai Union brands across Europe including John West in the UK and Netherlands, Petit Navire in France, and Mareblu in Italy. This document explains more about the Explorer II and its practices of using lights - a method which, not long after the writing of this document, has just been banned by the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission.

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