In pictures: the parasitic bond between water and coal

Posted by Angela Glienicke — 19 March 2014 at 4:55pm - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Kemal Jufri / Greenpeace
Coal barges come down the Mahakam river in Samarinda, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo

It’s World Water Day on Saturday and this year’s theme highlights the facts that water is needed to produce nearly all forms of energy and the demand for both is rising.

The toxic tale behind your clothing

Posted by Yifang Li — 23 November 2012 at 10:40am - Comments
Detox models
All rights reserved. Credit: Lance Lee/Greenpeace
Fashion companies like Zara are using toxic chemicals to make their clothes

What are you wearing today? Touch it. Go on. What does it feel like? Yes, you're touching a piece of clothing. You're touching a type of fabric. You're touching a fashion choice. And yet, there's more to it: You're also touching a story. Because every piece of clothing – in your wardrobe, in my wardrobe, in everyone's wardrobe – has a story.

Big clothing brands like H&M are listening to you

Posted by jamie — 27 October 2011 at 1:55pm - Comments
Greenpeace volunteer talks to a passer-by outside H&M in Stockholm
All rights reserved. Credit: Greenpeace/Ludvig Tillman
Fast results in fast fashion: you persuaded H&M to publish its restricted substances list

Tommy Crawford, communications manager on the Detox campaign, reveals the latest success story in getting clothing brands to ditch toxic chemicals.

As fashion-lovers around the world ponder over which clothes to add to their Christmas wishlists, news about a different list linked to the fashion industry has got the Detox team here buzzing. I’m talking about H&M’s Restricted Substance List, a detailed version of which appeared for the first time on the company’s website this month.

Surfing the Detox wave

Posted by Tamara Stark — 26 September 2011 at 1:51pm - Comments

As you’ve heard, we’re now seeing a growing wave of clothing companies committing to eliminate toxic chemicals from their production processes. Four major clothing brands have recently come onboard and we’re certain that more companies – and perhaps other industries – will soon stop using hazardous chemicals that currently contaminate the world’s waterways and environment.

Clickers and stickers make H&M detox

Posted by tracy.frauzel — 20 September 2011 at 9:08am - Comments
Wastewater discharged from a denim washing factory in Xintang, Zengcheng, China
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Wastewater discharged from a denim washing factory in Xintang, Zengcheng, China

Clothing giant H&M has responded to a torrent of tweets, Facebook updates, and Detox sticker actions last week with a public commitment to Detox. Hazardous chemicals are out. Transparency and transformational change are in.

Will H&M make “Detox” the new must-have?

Posted by tracy.frauzel — 13 September 2011 at 9:54am - Comments
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
70% of China's rivers and lakes are now dangerously polluted: manufacturing industry being the main cause

There's a skeleton in H&M's closet. The fast-fashion retailer sells clothes made with chemicals which cause hazardous water pollution around the world, and the only way to stop this water pollution is to come clean and stop using such chemicals for good. As one of the largest clothing groups in the world, a H&M committed to a toxic-free future would set a trend for the rest of the fashion industry to follow.

Greenpeace research reveals toxic chemicals in biggest clothing brands

Posted by Eoin D — 23 August 2011 at 2:30am - Comments
Clothing and the Global Toxic Cycle - 300 dpi
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace
Dirty Laundry: Clothing and the Global Toxic Cycle

Our latest research reveals that the clothes you are wearing may contain nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) - chemicals that are effectively banned in clothing manufacturing in Europe - which can break down in water to form nonylphenol (NP), a toxic, persistent and hormone-disrupting substance. 52 out of 78 garments from 14 global clothing, brands sold in the UK and the continent, tested positive for NPEs, including four Adidas articles.

Rebranding Adidas to Detox our Water

Posted by Eoin D — 19 August 2011 at 1:02pm - Comments
Greenpeace activists hang up two banners at Adidas Outlet store in Helsinki, rea
All rights reserved. Credit: ©Matti Snellman/ Greenpeace
Greenpeace activists hang up banners at Adidas store in Helsinki

Within hours of Nike's announcement on 18 August to champion a toxic-free future, Greenpeace activists in cities around the world headed to their nearest Adidas store with huge Detox stickers to rebrand the shop windows and doors.

Nike steals the lead in Detox challenge

Posted by Gemma Freeman — 18 August 2011 at 1:00am - Comments
Nike commits to a champion a toxic free future. Can adidas top that?
All rights reserved. Credit: © Greenpeace
Nike commits to champion a toxic-free future. Can Adidas top that?

The world's number one sportswear brand, Nike, has accepted our Detox challenge: today it has officially committed to eliminating all hazardous chemicals across its entire supply chain, and the entire life-cycle of its products by 2020. This is a major win for our campaign to protect the planet’s precious water, and create a toxic-free future.

Create a revolution in your wardrobe - part two

Posted by louise — 9 August 2011 at 1:58pm - Comments
Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy i
All rights reserved. Credit: © Lu Guang / Greenpeace
Girls sort scrap fabric in a family workshop in Gurao, China where the economy is centered on textile production.

In the second half of our tips on greening your wardrobe - to help you clean up your clothing inspired by our Detox campaign - we look at saying no to child labour, questioning distressed denim, avoiding greenwash, spring cleaning, speaking out and spreading the word.

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